Stem cells and metabolic diseases

Andreia Sofia Serapicos Bernardo, Kevin Docherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a metabolic disorder, which has been recognized as a global epidemic. it contributes to insulin resistance, the major cause of Type 2 diabetes, as well as to the development of other related diseases. Our basic premise is that a better understanding of how adult stem cells of the pancreas contribute to the maintenance of the pancreatic beta-cell pool against the increased metabolic demands associated with obesity may provide new therapeutic targets for treating diabetes. At the same time, if we knew more about the biology of adipocyte formation, maintenance and deposition in obese individuals, perhaps some control over the adipocyte tissue mass of these individuals would be facilitated and treatment of obesity would become available. Many investigations in the field are therefore aimed at describing how adipocyte stem cells function in the various sites of fat deposition and the extent to which these stem cells contribute to both brown and white adipocytes. Studies on the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells along the pancreatic and adipocyte lineages may therefore better inform approaches to these studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-365
Number of pages3
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • brown adipose tissue
  • endocrine pancreas
  • islet of Langerhans
  • obesity
  • preadipocyte
  • stem cell
  • white adipose tissue
  • fat
  • differentiaton
  • adipocytes
  • origin

Cite this

Stem cells and metabolic diseases. / Bernardo, Andreia Sofia Serapicos; Docherty, Kevin.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2008, p. 363-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernardo, ASS & Docherty, K 2008, 'Stem cells and metabolic diseases', Biochemical Society Transactions, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 363-365. https://doi.org/10.1042/BST0360363
Bernardo, Andreia Sofia Serapicos ; Docherty, Kevin. / Stem cells and metabolic diseases. In: Biochemical Society Transactions. 2008 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 363-365.
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