Storied Landscapes

Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums

Alison Kay Brown, Anita Herle, Tony Eccles

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Current anthropological research demonstrates that the apparently universal and foundational distinction between nature and culture is more pertinent in some societies than in others. In this paper we explore this idea with reference to how Blackfoot people relate to material in museum collections acquired from their communities.

With the support of a Leverhulme Networking Grant focused on Blackfoot collections in UK museums, project members from the UK visited places of historical and ceremonial significance in southern Alberta, Canada, and northern Montana, United States. Blackfoot colleagues used these visits to explain to curatorial staff the relationship between the materials they had engaged with in museum storerooms in Cambridge and Exeter the previous year and the landscape from which they emerged. The paper will focus on visits to Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park at the Siksika Nation, ceremonial sites located on and close to the Kainai Nation, and the Two Medicine River area of the Blackfeet Reservation to explore how stories about landscape and sites of encounter contribute to a fuller understanding of Blackfoot historic collections.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventAlison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference - Powell-Cotton Museum, United Kingdom
Duration: 21 Apr 201522 Apr 2015

Conference

ConferenceAlison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period21/04/1522/04/15

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Cite this

Brown, A. K., Herle, A., & Eccles, T. (2016). Storied Landscapes: Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums. Paper presented at Alison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference, United Kingdom.

Storied Landscapes : Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums. / Brown, Alison Kay; Herle, Anita; Eccles, Tony.

2016. Paper presented at Alison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Brown, AK, Herle, A & Eccles, T 2016, 'Storied Landscapes: Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums' Paper presented at Alison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference, United Kingdom, 21/04/15 - 22/04/15, .
Brown AK, Herle A, Eccles T. Storied Landscapes: Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums. 2016. Paper presented at Alison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference, United Kingdom.
Brown, Alison Kay ; Herle, Anita ; Eccles, Tony. / Storied Landscapes : Enlivening Blackfoot collections in UK Museums. Paper presented at Alison Brown, Tony Eccles, Anita Herle: “Storied LandscapNature and Culture in Museums, Museum Ethnographers Group Conference, United Kingdom.
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