Studying plant-microbe interactions using stable isotope technologies

James Ivor Prosser, Juan Ignacio Rangel-Castro, Kenneth Stuart Killham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interactions between plants and microorganisms in the rhizosphere are complex and varied. They include the general transfer of nutrients and specific interactions mediated by the release of signalling molecules from plant roots. Until recently, understanding the nature of these interactions was limited by a reliance on traditional, cultivation-based techniques. Stable isotope probing provides the potential for cultivation-independent characterisation of organisms actively assimilating carbon derived from plant root exudate or added to the soil. Current applications have focused on interactions with relatively low-level specificity, but there is significant potential for mechanistic studies of more specific interactions, particularly if the sensitivity of the technique can be increased.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-102
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Biotechnology
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • RHIZOSPHERE CARBON-FLOW
  • COMMUNITY DYNAMICS
  • MOLECULAR ANALYSIS
  • SOIL
  • MICROORGANISMS
  • TURNOVER
  • BACTERIA

Cite this

Studying plant-microbe interactions using stable isotope technologies. / Prosser, James Ivor; Rangel-Castro, Juan Ignacio; Killham, Kenneth Stuart.

In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Vol. 17, 2006, p. 98-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prosser, James Ivor ; Rangel-Castro, Juan Ignacio ; Killham, Kenneth Stuart. / Studying plant-microbe interactions using stable isotope technologies. In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology. 2006 ; Vol. 17. pp. 98-102.
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