Support for mothers and their families after life-threatening illness in pregnancy and childbirth: a qualitative study in primary care

Lisa Hinton, Louise Locock, Marian Knight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One in 100 women who give birth in the UK develop life-threatening illnesses during childbirth. Without urgent medical attention these illnesses could lead to the mother's death. Little is known about how the experience of severe illness in childbirth affects the mother, baby, and family.As part of the UK National Maternal Near-miss Surveillance Programme, this study explored the experiences of women and their partners of life-threatening illnesses in childbirth, to identify the long-term impact on women and their families.Qualitative study based on semi-structured narrative interviews. Interviews were conducted in patients' homes in England and Scotland from 2010 to 2014.An in-depth interview study was conducted with 36 women and 11 partners. A maximum variation sample was sought and interviews transcribed for thematic analysis with constant comparison.Women's birth-related illnesses often had long-lasting effects on their mental as well as physical health, including anxiety, panic attacks, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In some cases the partner's mental health was also affected. Women often described feeling isolated. Their experiences can have a profound impact on their relationships, family life, career, and future fertility. While some women described receiving good support from their GP, others felt there was little support available for them or their families after discharge from hospital.A near-miss event can have long-lasting and major effects on women and their families. Support in primary care, including watchful waiting for mental health impacts, can play a valuable role in helping these families come to terms with their emergency experience. The findings highlight the importance of communication between primary and secondary care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e563-e569
Number of pages7
JournalThe British Journal of General Practice
Volume65
Issue number638
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

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