Supporting shared decision-making and people’s understanding of medicines

An exploration of the acceptability and comprehensibility of patient information

Katie Gibson Smith, Jill L. Booth, Derek Stewart, Sharon Pfleger, Laura McIver, Kathrine MacLure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Patient information may assist in promoting shared decision-making, however it is imperative that the information presented is comprehensible and acceptable to the target audience. Objective: This study sought to explore the acceptability and comprehensibility of the ‘Medicines in Scotland: What’s the right treatment for you?’ factsheet to the general public. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with members of the public.An interview schedule was developed to explore the acceptability and comprehensibility of the factsheet. Participants were recruited by a researcher who distributed information packs to attendees (n=70) of four community pharmacies.Interviews, (12-24 minutes duration), were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a framework approach. Results: Nineteen participants returned a consent form (27.1%), twelve were interviewed. Six themes were identified: formatting of the factsheet and interpretation; prior health knowledge and the factsheet; information contained in the factsheet; impact of the factsheet on behaviour; uses for the factsheet; and revisions to the factsheet. Conclusions: The factsheet was generally perceived as helpful and comprehensive.It was highlighted that reading the leaflet may generate new knowledge and may have a positive impact on behaviour
Original languageEnglish
Article number1082
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacy Practice
Volume15
Issue number4
Early online date18 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2017

Fingerprint

Telephone
Medicine
Decision Making
Decision making
Health
Interviews
Consent Forms
Pharmacies
Scotland
Reading
Appointments and Schedules
Research Personnel
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • patient-centered care
  • information dissemination
  • patient preference
  • drug therapy
  • health promotion
  • pharmacies
  • pharmacists
  • qualitative research
  • United Kingdom

Cite this

Supporting shared decision-making and people’s understanding of medicines : An exploration of the acceptability and comprehensibility of patient information. / Gibson Smith, Katie; Booth, Jill L.; Stewart, Derek; Pfleger, Sharon; McIver, Laura; MacLure, Kathrine.

In: Pharmacy Practice , Vol. 15, No. 4, 1082, 31.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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note = "ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The research team would like to thank the community pharmacy management and staff for all their assistance in facilitating recruitment. Thanks also to our colleague Alyson Brown, Robert Gordon University, for her help with recruitment and to Linda Collins, Healthcare Improvement Scotland, for assisting with project materials. We are incredibly grateful to all participants who gave up their time to participate in the research and who provided such valuable feedback.",
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