'Team ethnography visual maps’: methods for identifying the ethnographic object in multiple sites of fieldwork

S. Parkin* (Corresponding Author), Louise Locock, C. Montgomery, A. Chisholm

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Major criticisms of the increasingly popular ‘team ethnography’ include a limited
understanding of how teams consisting of multiple ethnographers actually share their experience of team-based ethnography, and that there is an associated lack of explanation how evidence and conclusions are drawn from such collective endeavour. This article attempts to address this absence of detail regarding the practise and conduct of team ethnography. In the following account, the authors present details of the design, development and application of ‘team ethnography process maps’ and the collaborative reflexivity that took place within ‘team ethnography data sessions’ that were each embedded within a mixed methods study of frontline services located in six different National Health Service Trusts throughout England (UK). After a presentation of the unique ethnographic methods and analyses that occurred as part of team ethnography, they are then discussed in terms of their applied and academic value from a methodological perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-577
Number of pages22
JournalEthnography
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online date14 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • focused ethnography
  • team ethnography
  • team ethnography visual maps
  • team ethnography data sessions
  • qualitative health research
  • National Health Service (NHS England)

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