Navigating the Technology-Media-Movements Complex

Cristina Maria Flesher Fominaya, Kevin Gillan

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Abstract

In this article we develop the notion of the technology-media-movement complex (TMMC) as a field-definition statement for ongoing inquiry into the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in social and political movements. We consider the definitions and boundaries of the TMMC, arguing particularly for a historically rooted conception of technological development that allows better integration of the different intellectual traditions that are currently focused on the same set of empirical phenomena. We then delineate two recurrent debates in the literature highlighting their contributions to emerging knowledge. The first debate concerns the divide between scholars who privilege media technologies, and see them as driving forces of movement dynamics, and those who privilege media practices over affordances. The second debate broadly opposes theorists who believe in the emancipatory potential of ICTs and those who highlight the ways they are used to repress social movements and grassroots mobilization. By mapping positions in these debates to the TMMC we identify and provide direction to three broad research areas which demand further consideration: (i) questions of power and agency in social movements; (ii) the relationships between, on the one hand, social movements and technology and media as politics (i.e. cyberpolitics and technopolitics), and on the other, the quotidian and ubiquitous use of digital tools in a digital age; and (iii) the significance of digital divides that cut across and beyond social movements, particularly in the way such divisions may overlay existing power relations in movements. In conclusion, we delineate six challenges for profitable further research on the TMMC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-402
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Movement Studies
Volume16
Issue number4
Early online date23 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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media technology
Social Movements
privilege
communication technology
information technology
political movement
digital divide
technical development
mobilization
politics
demand

Keywords

  • technopolitics
  • social movements
  • technology
  • media
  • ICTs
  • digital divides
  • cyberpolitics

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Navigating the Technology-Media-Movements Complex. / Flesher Fominaya, Cristina Maria; Gillan, Kevin.

In: Social Movement Studies, Vol. 16, No. 4, 2017, p. 383-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flesher Fominaya, Cristina Maria ; Gillan, Kevin. / Navigating the Technology-Media-Movements Complex. In: Social Movement Studies. 2017 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 383-402.
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