The Anthropologist as Both Disaster Victim and Disaster Researcher: Reflections and Advocacy

Hiroki Takakura

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    How should an anthropologist respond to a disaster that has occurred in his or her hometown? When one is simultaneously a researcher of a disaster and a victim of that same disaster, the range of reaction may be limited, but on the other hand, one may be privy to a deep insider’s view. Takakura describes some of the practical difficulties faced by such researchers, as well as advantages, based on his own experiences of the Great East Japan Earthquake and of leading a Tohoku University project aimed at recording and archiving the narratives of people who experienced the earthquake. This study explores the academic and social significances of the project, and considers the role of the anthropologist as a citizen at home.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCrisis and Disaster in Japan and New Zealand
    EditorsSusan Bouteray, Lawrence Marceau
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Pages79-103
    Number of pages26
    ISBN (Electronic)978-981-13-0244-2
    ISBN (Print)978-981-13-0243-5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

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  • Cite this

    Takakura, H. (2019). The Anthropologist as Both Disaster Victim and Disaster Researcher: Reflections and Advocacy. In S. Bouteray, & L. Marceau (Eds.), Crisis and Disaster in Japan and New Zealand (pp. 79-103). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0244-2_6