The cognitive capitalist

Social benefits of perceptual economy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the perceptual processes that support the extraction of social information from faces and how these fit within extant models of social cognition. It assesses the efficiency with which our perceptual system extracts visual information from faces to provide us with useful social cues. To this end, the chapter considers the minimal perceptual requirements associated with categorization and individuation early in the person-construal process, rather than in the content of stereotypes and prejudices that occur further down the processing stream.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Science of Social Vision
EditorsReginald B Adams, Nalini Ambady, Ken Nakayama, Shinsuke Shimojo
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199864324
ISBN (Print)9780195333176
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

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Economy
Person
Perceptual Processes
Social Cognition
Stereotypes
Construal
Prejudice
Individuation

Keywords

  • visual perception
  • social cognition
  • perceptual efficiency
  • person categorization
  • face perception

Cite this

Martin, D., & Macrae, C. N. (2010). The cognitive capitalist: Social benefits of perceptual economy. In R. B. Adams, N. Ambady, K. Nakayama, & S. Shimojo (Eds.), The Science of Social Vision Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0003

The cognitive capitalist : Social benefits of perceptual economy. / Martin, Douglas; Macrae, C. Neil.

The Science of Social Vision. ed. / Reginald B Adams; Nalini Ambady; Ken Nakayama; Shinsuke Shimojo. Oxford University Press, 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Martin, D & Macrae, CN 2010, The cognitive capitalist: Social benefits of perceptual economy. in RB Adams, N Ambady, K Nakayama & S Shimojo (eds), The Science of Social Vision. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0003
Martin D, Macrae CN. The cognitive capitalist: Social benefits of perceptual economy. In Adams RB, Ambady N, Nakayama K, Shimojo S, editors, The Science of Social Vision. Oxford University Press. 2010 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0003
Martin, Douglas ; Macrae, C. Neil. / The cognitive capitalist : Social benefits of perceptual economy. The Science of Social Vision. editor / Reginald B Adams ; Nalini Ambady ; Ken Nakayama ; Shinsuke Shimojo. Oxford University Press, 2010.
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