The colonic metabolites dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid are more effective inhibitors of in vitro platelet activation than their phenolic precursors

Gema Baeza, Eva-Maria Bachmair, Sharon Wood, Raquel Mateos, Laura Bravo, Baukje De Roos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The consumption of healthy diets rich in polyphenols has been inversely associated with the development of CVD. This study evaluated the effects of green coffee bean (GCBE) and yerba mate (YMPE) phenolic extracts, the main phenolic and methylxanthines constituents (5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, caffeine, and theobromine), and their main metabolites (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid -DHCA- and dihydroferulic acid -DHFA-) on platelet activation in vitro. Upon incubation with different doses (0.01 – 100 µg/mL or µM) of each compound, adenosine 5’-diphosphate-induced P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding were determined using whole blood flow cytometry. Platelet P-selectin expression was significantly decreased by YMPE and all phenolic and methylxanthines constituents at physiological concentrations, compared with control, whereas fibrinogen binding on platelets was significantly increased. The colonic metabolites (DHCA and DHFA) had stronger inhibitory effects on P-selectin expression than their phenolic precursors, suggesting an increase in the efficacy to modulate platelet activation with the metabolism of the phenolic compounds.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1333-1342
Number of pages10
JournalFood & Function
Volume8
Issue number3
Early online date9 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • green coffee
  • yerba mate
  • phenolic compounds
  • methylxanthines
  • metabolites
  • platelet activation

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