The correct analysis of shocks in a cellular material

John J Harrigan, Stephen R Reid, A Seyed Yaghoubi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular materials have applications for impact and blast protection. Under impact/impulsive loading the response of the cellular solid can be controlled by compaction (or shock, see Tan et al. (2005) [3] and [4]) waves. Different analytical and computational solutions have been produced to model this behaviour but these solutions provide conflicting predictions for the response of the material in certain loading scenarios. The different analytical approaches are discussed using two simple examples for clarity. The differences between apparently similar “models” are clarified. In particular, it is argued that mass-spring models are not capable of modelling the discontinuities that exist in a compaction wave in a cellular material.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)918-927
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Impact Engineering
Volume37
Issue number8
Early online date4 May 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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Keywords

  • cellular material
  • compaction wave
  • shock wave

Cite this

The correct analysis of shocks in a cellular material. / Harrigan, John J; Reid, Stephen R; Seyed Yaghoubi, A.

In: International Journal of Impact Engineering, Vol. 37, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 918-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harrigan, John J ; Reid, Stephen R ; Seyed Yaghoubi, A. / The correct analysis of shocks in a cellular material. In: International Journal of Impact Engineering. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 918-927.
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