The cost-effectiveness of a volunteer lifestyle coaching weight reduction programme for women attending routine breast cancer screening - results from the actwell trial

P. McNamee, S. Treweek, A. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Background/purpose: There are several health impacts and large health
care costs associated with overweight and obesity, including additional
risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast and
other cancers. These risks suggest a need to develop effective
and cost-effective weight management programmes to reduce the
prevalence of overweight and obesity. We report the costeffectiveness of a novel volunteer-led 12-month weight management
programme (“ActWELL”) initiated in breast cancer screening centres
across Scotland.
Methods: The cost-effectiveness of the ActWELL programme is measured relative to usual care, adopting the perspective of the National Health Service, using data from a four centre, 1:1 parallel group randomised controlled trial (n=560). We identify, measure and value health care resource use and health-related quality of life (using EQ-5D5L) data at baseline, three months and 12-month follow-up amongst women aged between 50-70 years of age with Body Mass Index
>25kg/m2 who attended routine breast cancer screening clinics and
agreed to participate in the trial. The incremental cost per quality adjusted
life year (QALY) gained over 12 months is calculated using the ratio of
the difference in the mean costs and mean QALY across all participants.
Primary analysis is conducted on an intention-to-treat basis and performed for participants with complete data on resource use and EQ-5D5L values. Additional analysis is also reported for missing data and the robustness of results tested using sensitivity analysis.
Results: Results will be available and presented.
Conclusions and Implications: The main conclusions and implications for policy and practice will be discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S207-S208
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume28
Issue numberSUPPL 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2021

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