The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo

Graeme Barker, Chris Hunt (Collaborator), Huw Barton (Collaborator), Chris Gosdon (Collaborator), Sam Jones (Collaborator), Lindsay Lloyd-Smith (Collaborator), Lucy Farr (Collaborator), Shawn O'Donnell (Collaborator)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Borneo has a 50,000-year record of Homo sapiens' interactions with rainforest on the coastal lowlands assembled especially by the interdisciplinary investigation of the archaeology and palaeoecology of the Niah Caves on the coastal plain of Sarawak (Barker et al., 2007; Barker, 2013). More recent work by many of the same team in the interior of Borneo, in the Kelabit Highlands of Sarawak, has combined those approaches with ethnography and anthropology to investigate recent and present-day, as well as past, human-rainforest interactions. In combination, the two projects indicate that the present-day rainforests of Borneo are the product of a deep ecological history related to both natural factors such as climate change and cultural factors such as how different groups of people chose to extract their livelihoods from the forest, including in ways that do not have simple analogies with the subsistence activities of present-day rainforest foragers and farmers in Borneo.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-61
Number of pages18
JournalQuaternary International
Volume448
Early online date15 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Aug 2017

Fingerprint

rainforest
anthropology
paleoecology
archaeology
subsistence
coastal plain
cave
climate change
history

Keywords

  • Biomass burning
  • Niah caves
  • Kelabit Highlands
  • vegeculture rice agriculture

Cite this

Barker, G., Hunt, C., Barton, H., Gosdon, C., Jones, S., Lloyd-Smith, L., ... O'Donnell, S. (2017). The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo. Quaternary International, 448, 44-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2016.08.018

The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo. / Barker, Graeme; Hunt, Chris (Collaborator); Barton, Huw (Collaborator); Gosdon, Chris (Collaborator); Jones, Sam (Collaborator); Lloyd-Smith, Lindsay (Collaborator); Farr, Lucy (Collaborator); O'Donnell, Shawn (Collaborator).

In: Quaternary International, Vol. 448, 20.08.2017, p. 44-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barker, G, Hunt, C, Barton, H, Gosdon, C, Jones, S, Lloyd-Smith, L, Farr, L & O'Donnell, S 2017, 'The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo', Quaternary International, vol. 448, pp. 44-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2016.08.018
Barker G, Hunt C, Barton H, Gosdon C, Jones S, Lloyd-Smith L et al. The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo. Quaternary International. 2017 Aug 20;448:44-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2016.08.018
Barker, Graeme ; Hunt, Chris ; Barton, Huw ; Gosdon, Chris ; Jones, Sam ; Lloyd-Smith, Lindsay ; Farr, Lucy ; O'Donnell, Shawn. / The ‘cultured rainforests’ of Borneo. In: Quaternary International. 2017 ; Vol. 448. pp. 44-61.
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