The declines in fertility and a gain in demographic dividend in Nepal

Are these the causes of poverty reduction?

Yagya Prasad Subedi, Nicolas Feltovich

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

This study tries to investigate the true relationship between decline in fertility, demographic devidend and reduction in poverty in Nepal. Therefore, this study will examine the following questions to investigate the relationship between the decline in fertility and reduction in poverty in the context of Nepal. How can we measure poverty? What are the possible proxies for measuring poverty? What are the indicators of fertility? How fertility influences poverty? What are the possible pathways from decline in fertility to reduction in poverty? What are the causes and consequences of declining fertility? The results show that the parents, whose total fertility rate was more than 2.1, were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the families who had low fertility. Likewise, it was found that the mothers, whose age of first marriage was below 20 years, were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose age at first marriage was higher than that. Similarly, it was found that the mothers whose last birth interval was less than 18 months were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose birth interval is longer. Moreover, it was also found that the mothers whose median age at first birth was less than 20 years were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose age was higher. Finally, it was found that the parents from son preferential culture were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the parents whose culture was non-gender preferential. Decline in fertility in Nepal has provided the demographic bonus (or dividends) to the economy. Hence, the gained demographic bonus has been channelized into socio-health and economic development; hence, the decline in poverty has been a cause of the reduction in poverty in Nepal.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 17 May 2013

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fertility
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fertility rate

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The declines in fertility and a gain in demographic dividend in Nepal : Are these the causes of poverty reduction? / Subedi, Yagya Prasad; Feltovich, Nicolas.

2013.

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

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abstract = "This study tries to investigate the true relationship between decline in fertility, demographic devidend and reduction in poverty in Nepal. Therefore, this study will examine the following questions to investigate the relationship between the decline in fertility and reduction in poverty in the context of Nepal. How can we measure poverty? What are the possible proxies for measuring poverty? What are the indicators of fertility? How fertility influences poverty? What are the possible pathways from decline in fertility to reduction in poverty? What are the causes and consequences of declining fertility? The results show that the parents, whose total fertility rate was more than 2.1, were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the families who had low fertility. Likewise, it was found that the mothers, whose age of first marriage was below 20 years, were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose age at first marriage was higher than that. Similarly, it was found that the mothers whose last birth interval was less than 18 months were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose birth interval is longer. Moreover, it was also found that the mothers whose median age at first birth was less than 20 years were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the mothers whose age was higher. Finally, it was found that the parents from son preferential culture were more likely to be in poverty trap in comparison the parents whose culture was non-gender preferential. Decline in fertility in Nepal has provided the demographic bonus (or dividends) to the economy. Hence, the gained demographic bonus has been channelized into socio-health and economic development; hence, the decline in poverty has been a cause of the reduction in poverty in Nepal.",
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