The Disintegration of Urban Policy: Glasgow and the New Britain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In the past, the conflict between the growth and distributional aspects of urban policy has not been a major issue in Britain. In Glasgow, the institutional reforms of the 1970s heralded a comprehensive, public-sector-directed program for urban regeneration. In the 1980s, policy has disintegrated under the impact of recession, local fiscal cutback, and central government and agency intervention. A conflict between growth and distribution is posed. Glasgow emerges as a dual city, with subsidization of downtown business and amenities but widespread deprivation, especially on the periphery—reflecting conditions more widely seen in the "new Britain."
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-536
Number of pages24
JournalUrban Affairs Quarterly
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 1989

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urban policy
institutional reform
amenity
public sector
regeneration
conflict
policy
distribution
central government
programme
city

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The Disintegration of Urban Policy : Glasgow and the New Britain. / Keating, Michael James.

In: Urban Affairs Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.06.1989, p. 513-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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