The effect of a 12 week walking intervention on markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation

Stuart R Gray, Graham Baker, Annemarie Wright, Claire F Fitzsimons, Nanette Mutrie, Myra A Nimmo, Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a community-based walking intervention, using pedometers, is effective in reducing systemic inflammatory markers.

Methods: Participants (age = 49(8.9)) were recruited in Glasgow, United Kingdom, from August to December 2006 and were randomly assigned to a control (n = 24; 6 males, no change in walking) and intervention group (n = 24; 5 males gradually increasing walking by 3000 steps/day on 5 days of the week). Blood samples were collected at baseline, and after 12 weeks, and analysed for glucose, insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) and soluble TNF receptors I and II (sTNFR1 and sTNFRII).

Results: In the control group baseline step counts were 6356 (2953) steps/day and did not change (P > 0.05) after 12 weeks, 6709 (2918) steps/day. The intervention group increased (P < 0.001) step count from 6682 (3761) steps/day at baseline to 10182 (4081) steps/day at 12 weeks. Over the 12 week period there was no change in any other variables measured, in either control or intervention group.

Conclusion: We conclude that the current community-based intervention did not affect systemic markers of inflammation or insulin sensitivity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume48
Issue number1
Early online date29 Oct 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Walking
Insulin Resistance
Inflammation
Interleukin-6 Receptors
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
C-Reactive Protein
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Glucose
Control Groups
United Kingdom

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • adult
  • aged
  • biological markers
  • female
  • humans
  • insulin resistance
  • male
  • middle aged
  • monitoring, physiologic
  • Scotland
  • systemic inflammatory response syndrome
  • walking
  • young adult
  • physical activity
  • pedometers
  • inflammation

Cite this

Gray, S. R., Baker, G., Wright, A., Fitzsimons, C. F., Mutrie, N., Nimmo, M. A., & Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl) (2009). The effect of a 12 week walking intervention on markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. Preventive Medicine, 48(1), 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.013

The effect of a 12 week walking intervention on markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. / Gray, Stuart R; Baker, Graham; Wright, Annemarie; Fitzsimons, Claire F; Mutrie, Nanette; Nimmo, Myra A; Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl).

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, SR, Baker, G, Wright, A, Fitzsimons, CF, Mutrie, N, Nimmo, MA & Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl) 2009, 'The effect of a 12 week walking intervention on markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation', Preventive Medicine, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.013
Gray, Stuart R ; Baker, Graham ; Wright, Annemarie ; Fitzsimons, Claire F ; Mutrie, Nanette ; Nimmo, Myra A ; Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl). / The effect of a 12 week walking intervention on markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. In: Preventive Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 39-44.
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