The effect of root exudates on rhizosphere water dynamics

L. J. Cooper, K. R. Daly, P. D. Hallett, N. Koebernick, T. S. George, T. Roose* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Most water and nutrients essential for plant growth travel across a thin zone of soil at the interface between roots and soil, termed the rhizosphere. Chemicals exuded by plant roots can alter the fluid properties, such as viscosity, of the water phase, potentially with impacts on plant productivity and stress tolerance. In this paper, we study the effects of plant exudates on the macroscale properties of water movement in soil. Our starting point is a microscale description of two fluid flow and exudate diffusion in a periodic geometry composed from a regular repetition of a unit cell. Using multiscale homogenization theory, we derive a coupled set of equations that describe the movement of air and water, and the diffusion of plant exudates on the macroscale. These equations are parametrized by a set of cell problems that capture the flow behaviour. The mathematical steps are validated by comparing the resulting homogenized equations to the original pore scale equations, and we show that the difference between the two models is 7% for eight cells. The resulting equations provide a computationally efficient method to study plant–soil interactions. This will increase our ability to predict how contrasting root exudation patterns may influence crop uptake of water and nutrients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0149
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume474
Issue number2217
Early online date5 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Roots
Water
Soil
soils
water
nutrients
Soils
Nutrients
Cell
plant roots
cells
Homogenization Theory
crops
homogenizing
productivity
microbalances
travel
Productivity
Crops
fluid flow

Keywords

  • Homogenization
  • Porous media
  • Richards’ equation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematics(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

The effect of root exudates on rhizosphere water dynamics. / Cooper, L. J.; Daly, K. R.; Hallett, P. D.; Koebernick, N.; George, T. S.; Roose, T. (Corresponding Author).

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 474, No. 2217, 0149, 09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooper, L. J. ; Daly, K. R. ; Hallett, P. D. ; Koebernick, N. ; George, T. S. ; Roose, T. / The effect of root exudates on rhizosphere water dynamics. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 2018 ; Vol. 474, No. 2217.
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abstract = "Most water and nutrients essential for plant growth travel across a thin zone of soil at the interface between roots and soil, termed the rhizosphere. Chemicals exuded by plant roots can alter the fluid properties, such as viscosity, of the water phase, potentially with impacts on plant productivity and stress tolerance. In this paper, we study the effects of plant exudates on the macroscale properties of water movement in soil. Our starting point is a microscale description of two fluid flow and exudate diffusion in a periodic geometry composed from a regular repetition of a unit cell. Using multiscale homogenization theory, we derive a coupled set of equations that describe the movement of air and water, and the diffusion of plant exudates on the macroscale. These equations are parametrized by a set of cell problems that capture the flow behaviour. The mathematical steps are validated by comparing the resulting homogenized equations to the original pore scale equations, and we show that the difference between the two models is 7{\%} for eight cells. The resulting equations provide a computationally efficient method to study plant–soil interactions. This will increase our ability to predict how contrasting root exudation patterns may influence crop uptake of water and nutrients.",
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