The effect of stanford-type self-management programmes on pain and function in older people with persistent pain

A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Denis Martin*, Patricia Schofield, Derek Jones, Paul McNamee, Amanda Clarke, Geraldine Anthony, Blair Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-management is advocated for older people with persistent pain. Self-management can be used to describe a range of approaches. Of these, the model developed at Stanford University is one of the most well-known. To examine claims of the effectiveness of this approach for pain and function in older people we carried out a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Trials were included in which participants were aged at least 65 years old and living in the community with persistent pain; the intervention arm was the Stanford model or a close derivative; and measures were taken of pain severity, and/or physical function and/or psychological function at a follow up of at least 6 months. Studies were excluded if the sample also contained people younger than 65 years old or if they were in a language other than English. Three RCTs were identified, each rated as moderate quality. Analysis showed a lack of convincing evidence in support of the Stanford model of self-management or close derivatives, as delivered in the trials, for reducing pain severity or improving function in people over 65 years old with persistent pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pain Management
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Self Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pain
Language
Psychology

Keywords

  • Pain
  • Persistent pain
  • Randomised trails
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

The effect of stanford-type self-management programmes on pain and function in older people with persistent pain : A systematic review of randomised controlled trials. / Martin, Denis; Schofield, Patricia; Jones, Derek; McNamee, Paul; Clarke, Amanda; Anthony, Geraldine; Smith, Blair.

In: Journal of Pain Management, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2013, p. 117-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Martin, Denis ; Schofield, Patricia ; Jones, Derek ; McNamee, Paul ; Clarke, Amanda ; Anthony, Geraldine ; Smith, Blair. / The effect of stanford-type self-management programmes on pain and function in older people with persistent pain : A systematic review of randomised controlled trials. In: Journal of Pain Management. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 117-122.
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