The eyes have it

Using eye tracking to inform information processing strategies in multi-attributes choices

Mandy Ryan (Corresponding Author), Nicolas Krucien, Frouke Hermens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Whilst choice experiments (CEs) are widely applied in economics to study choice behaviour, understanding of how individuals’ process attribute information remains limited. We show how eye-tracking methods can provide insight into how decisions are made. Participants completed a CE while their eye movements were recorded. Results show that while the information presented guided participants’ decisions, there were also several processing biases at work. Evidence was found of (i) top-to-bottom, (ii) left-to-right and (iii) first-to-last order biases. Experimental factors - whether attributes are defined as ‘best’ or ‘worst’, choice task complexity and attribute ordering - also influence information processing. How individuals visually process attribute information was shown to be related to their choices. Implications for the design and analysis of CEs and future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709-721
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Economics
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date27 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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Choice Behavior
Eye Movements
Automatic Data Processing
Economics

Keywords

  • choice experiments
  • choices
  • eye tracking
  • information processing

Cite this

The eyes have it : Using eye tracking to inform information processing strategies in multi-attributes choices. / Ryan, Mandy (Corresponding Author); Krucien, Nicolas; Hermens, Frouke.

In: Health Economics, Vol. 27, No. 4, 04.2018, p. 709-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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