The Help for Hay Fever community pharmacy-based pilot randomised controlled trial for intermittent allergic rhinitis

Sarah Smith, Terry Porteous* (Corresponding Author), Christine Bond, Jill Francis, Amanda J Lee, Richard Lowrie, Graham Scotland, Aziz Sheikh, Mike Thomas, Sally Wyke, Lorraine Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Management of intermittent allergic rhinitis (IAR) is suboptimal in the UK. An Australian community pharmacy-based intervention has been shown to help patients better self-manage their IAR. We conducted a pilot cluster-RCT in twelve Scottish community pharmacies to assess transferability of the Australian intervention. Trained staff in intervention pharmacies delivered the intervention to eligible customers (n=60). Non-intervention pharmacy participants (n=65) received usual care. Outcome measures included effect size of change in the mini-Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (miniRQLQ) between baseline, 1-week and 6-week follow-up. Trial procedures were well received by pharmacy staff, and customer satisfaction with the intervention was high. The standardised effect size for miniRQLQ total score was -0.46 (95% CI, -1.05, 0.13) for all participants and -0.14 (95% CI,-0.86, 0.57) in the complete case analysis, suggesting a small overall treatment effect in the intervention group. A full scale RCT is warranted to fully evaluate the effectiveness of this service.
Original languageEnglish
Article number23
Pages (from-to)23
Number of pages8
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • respiratory
  • allergy
  • community pharmacy
  • self-care
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • MANAGEMENT
  • GUIDELINES
  • VALIDATION
  • ADULTS
  • IMPACT
  • ASTHMA
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • HEALTH
  • BURDEN

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