The impact of physical activity level on the short- and long-term pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education

a study of 12,796 Danish patients with knee osteoarthritis

S. T. Skou* (Corresponding Author), A. Bricca, E. M. Roos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: It is unknown if people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are already physically active benefit from exercise therapy. To study the impact of physical activity level on pain relief, post-intervention and 12 months following exercise therapy and education. Method: The analyses included 12,796 patients with knee OA from the Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D®) program. GLA:D® consists of 12 sessions of supervised neuromuscular exercise and two sessions of education delivered by trained physical therapists. The impact of physical activity level on change in knee pain intensity (0–100) immediately post-intervention and at 12 months was estimated using a mixed-effects model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), educational level and comorbidity. Physical activity level was assessed using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale. Results: Physically inactive patients had worse baseline pain compared to patients with low to very high physical activity level (6–15 points worse; P < 0.001). Pain decreased by 13.4 points (95% CI; 9.7 to 17.1) following the treatment program and by 12.8 points (7.7–18.0) at 12 months in the inactive patients, with similar improvements in patients with higher levels of physical activity (P = 0.278 to 0.851). Conclusion: In patients with knee OA, similar and persistent long-term pain relief was found from supervised exercise therapy and education regardless of the initial physical activity level. Patients with high to very high levels of physical activity can expect pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education similar to that of more physically inactive patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Early online date2 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Exercise Therapy
Knee Osteoarthritis
Education
Exercise
Pain
Los Angeles
Physical Therapists
Denmark
Osteoarthritis
Comorbidity
Knee
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Exercise therapy
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{8c7cd68b07f34dd0ba521d4fed65f75f,
title = "The impact of physical activity level on the short- and long-term pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education: a study of 12,796 Danish patients with knee osteoarthritis",
abstract = "Objectives: It is unknown if people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are already physically active benefit from exercise therapy. To study the impact of physical activity level on pain relief, post-intervention and 12 months following exercise therapy and education. Method: The analyses included 12,796 patients with knee OA from the Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D{\circledR}) program. GLA:D{\circledR} consists of 12 sessions of supervised neuromuscular exercise and two sessions of education delivered by trained physical therapists. The impact of physical activity level on change in knee pain intensity (0–100) immediately post-intervention and at 12 months was estimated using a mixed-effects model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), educational level and comorbidity. Physical activity level was assessed using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale. Results: Physically inactive patients had worse baseline pain compared to patients with low to very high physical activity level (6–15 points worse; P < 0.001). Pain decreased by 13.4 points (95{\%} CI; 9.7 to 17.1) following the treatment program and by 12.8 points (7.7–18.0) at 12 months in the inactive patients, with similar improvements in patients with higher levels of physical activity (P = 0.278 to 0.851). Conclusion: In patients with knee OA, similar and persistent long-term pain relief was found from supervised exercise therapy and education regardless of the initial physical activity level. Patients with high to very high levels of physical activity can expect pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education similar to that of more physically inactive patients.",
keywords = "Exercise therapy, Osteoarthritis, Physical activity",
author = "Skou, {S. T.} and A. Bricca and Roos, {E. M.}",
note = "GLA:D{\circledR} is partly funded by the Danish Physiotherapy Association's fund for research, education and practice development; the Danish Rheumatism Association; and the Physiotherapy Practice Foundation. Dr. Skou is currently funded by the Independent Research Fund Denmark (DFF – 6110-00045) and the Lundbeck Foundation.",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.joca.2018.07.010",
language = "English",
journal = "Osteoarthritis and Cartilage",
issn = "1063-4584",
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T1 - The impact of physical activity level on the short- and long-term pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education

T2 - a study of 12,796 Danish patients with knee osteoarthritis

AU - Skou, S. T.

AU - Bricca, A.

AU - Roos, E. M.

N1 - GLA:D® is partly funded by the Danish Physiotherapy Association's fund for research, education and practice development; the Danish Rheumatism Association; and the Physiotherapy Practice Foundation. Dr. Skou is currently funded by the Independent Research Fund Denmark (DFF – 6110-00045) and the Lundbeck Foundation.

PY - 2018/8/2

Y1 - 2018/8/2

N2 - Objectives: It is unknown if people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are already physically active benefit from exercise therapy. To study the impact of physical activity level on pain relief, post-intervention and 12 months following exercise therapy and education. Method: The analyses included 12,796 patients with knee OA from the Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D®) program. GLA:D® consists of 12 sessions of supervised neuromuscular exercise and two sessions of education delivered by trained physical therapists. The impact of physical activity level on change in knee pain intensity (0–100) immediately post-intervention and at 12 months was estimated using a mixed-effects model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), educational level and comorbidity. Physical activity level was assessed using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale. Results: Physically inactive patients had worse baseline pain compared to patients with low to very high physical activity level (6–15 points worse; P < 0.001). Pain decreased by 13.4 points (95% CI; 9.7 to 17.1) following the treatment program and by 12.8 points (7.7–18.0) at 12 months in the inactive patients, with similar improvements in patients with higher levels of physical activity (P = 0.278 to 0.851). Conclusion: In patients with knee OA, similar and persistent long-term pain relief was found from supervised exercise therapy and education regardless of the initial physical activity level. Patients with high to very high levels of physical activity can expect pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education similar to that of more physically inactive patients.

AB - Objectives: It is unknown if people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are already physically active benefit from exercise therapy. To study the impact of physical activity level on pain relief, post-intervention and 12 months following exercise therapy and education. Method: The analyses included 12,796 patients with knee OA from the Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D®) program. GLA:D® consists of 12 sessions of supervised neuromuscular exercise and two sessions of education delivered by trained physical therapists. The impact of physical activity level on change in knee pain intensity (0–100) immediately post-intervention and at 12 months was estimated using a mixed-effects model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), educational level and comorbidity. Physical activity level was assessed using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale. Results: Physically inactive patients had worse baseline pain compared to patients with low to very high physical activity level (6–15 points worse; P < 0.001). Pain decreased by 13.4 points (95% CI; 9.7 to 17.1) following the treatment program and by 12.8 points (7.7–18.0) at 12 months in the inactive patients, with similar improvements in patients with higher levels of physical activity (P = 0.278 to 0.851). Conclusion: In patients with knee OA, similar and persistent long-term pain relief was found from supervised exercise therapy and education regardless of the initial physical activity level. Patients with high to very high levels of physical activity can expect pain relief from supervised exercise therapy and education similar to that of more physically inactive patients.

KW - Exercise therapy

KW - Osteoarthritis

KW - Physical activity

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U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2018.07.010

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2018.07.010

M3 - Article

JO - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

JF - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

SN - 1063-4584

ER -