The impact of poor asthma control among asthma patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids plus long-acting β2-agonists in the United Kingdom: a cross-sectional analysis

Ian D. Pavord (Corresponding Author), Nicola Mathieson, Anna Scowcroft, Riccardo Pedersini, David B Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

There are several new treatment options for patients whose asthma remains uncontrolled on free-dose and fixed-dose combinations of inhaled corticosteroids plus long-acting β2-agonists (ICS+LABA). In order to evaluate the likely impact of these treatments, we assessed the effect of uncontrolled asthma on healthcare and patient burden within the UK among adult patients treated with ICS+LABA. Data obtained from 2010–2011 UK National Health and Wellness Surveys identified 701 patients treated with ICS+LABA. Patients with not well-controlled asthma (Asthma Control Test™ score <20) were compared with well-controlled asthma (score ≥ 20) patients on multiple measures. Cost burden was calculated using healthcare resource utilisation models and work productivity and impairment questionnaire. Overall, 452 and 249 patients reported not well-controlled and well-controlled asthma, respectively. A greater proportion of not well-controlled patients visited the accident & emergency department (21 vs. 14%, P = 0.016), were hospitalised (13 vs. 8%, P = 0.022) and had lower mental and physical health-related quality of life (P < 0.001) and impaired work productivity and activity scores: presenteeism (23 vs. 11%, P < 0.001), work impairment (29 vs. 17%, P < 0.001) and activity impairment (46 vs. 24%, P < 0.001). Calculated direct and indirect yearly costs/person doubled among not well-controlled compared to well-controlled asthma patients (£6592 vs. £3220). Total cost to society was estimated at £6172 million/year (direct costs, £1307 million; indirect costs, £4865 million). In conclusion, not well-controlled asthma is common among UK adults treated with ICS+LABA, resulting in impairments across a number of important health outcomes and represents a significant unmet need and resource burden.
Original languageEnglish
Article number17
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume27
Early online date9 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • asthma
  • health care economics
  • quality of life

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