The Impact of the Scottish Parliament in Amending Executive Legislation

M. Shephard, Paul Alexander Cairney

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper provides the first systematic attempt to investigate the legislative impact of the Scottish Parliament on Executive legislation, by analysing the fate of all amendments to Executive bills from the Parliament's first session (1999-2003). Initial findings on the success of bill amendments show that the balance of power inclines strongly in favour of ministers. However, when we account for the type of amendment and initial authorship we find evidence that the Parliament (both coalition and opposition MSPs) actually makes more of an impact, particularly in terms of the level of success of substantive amendments to Executive bills. Our findings have implications for much of the current literature that is sceptical of the existence of power sharing between the Executive and the Parliament and within the Parliament.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)303-319
    Number of pages16
    JournalPolitical Studies
    Volume53
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Keywords

    • EUROPEAN-PARLIAMENT
    • SCOTLAND

    Cite this

    The Impact of the Scottish Parliament in Amending Executive Legislation. / Shephard, M.; Cairney, Paul Alexander.

    In: Political Studies, Vol. 53, No. 2, 2005, p. 303-319.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Shephard, M. ; Cairney, Paul Alexander. / The Impact of the Scottish Parliament in Amending Executive Legislation. In: Political Studies. 2005 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 303-319.
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