The importance of preparation for doctors' handovers in an acute medical assessment unit: a hierarchical task analysis

Michelle A Raduma Tomas, Rhona Flin, Steven Yule, Steven Close

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To examine the ideal and actual processes of doctors' handovers in an acute medical assessment unit by means of a hierarchical task analysis (HTA) to identify any discrepancies between the ideal shift handover process as described by doctors, and the actual shift handover process as observed by the researcher.

Method: The HTA was constructed using information gathered from interviews (n=13) describing the activities doctors said they should ideally perform in preparation for the shift handover meeting, during the meeting and after the meeting has finished. Observations (n=32) were made pre handover, during handover and post handover to capture the actual handover process in the acute medical assessment unit. Furthermore, a focus group discussion was included to validate the researcher's observations of the actual handover process and to provide content validity to the constructed HTA of the ideal handover process.

Results: Findings as represented by the HTA diagram showed the complexity of the process. The diagram revealed critical tasks that should be completed at each phase of the handover process, but observations revealed that these were sometimes omitted, mainly due to work demands and time pressure. These omissions were most apparent in the pre-handover stage, resulting in interrupted, extended and/or delayed handover meetings.

Conclusion: The pre-handover phase is critical in providing a foundation for a thorough handover meeting and potentially helping doctors who have started a shift to prioritise patient care. These findings suggest that quality improvements for clinical handovers should include a designated time for preparation of care transfer information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalBMJ Quality & Safety
Volume21
Issue number3
Early online date30 Nov 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • support
  • shift handover

Cite this

The importance of preparation for doctors' handovers in an acute medical assessment unit : a hierarchical task analysis. / Raduma Tomas, Michelle A; Flin, Rhona; Yule, Steven; Close, Steven.

In: BMJ Quality & Safety, Vol. 21, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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