The impossible task of replacing a model heir: The death of Ferdinand-Philippe d’Orléans and the ‘new France’

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

From a dynastic perspective the French monarchy seemed rock solid in July 1842. King Louis-Philippe I and Queen Marie-Amélie were blessed with ten children. Five of their sons had reached adulthood; young Prince Antoine celebrated his eighteenth birthday that summer.1 The king was very fond of his seven grandchildren, among them six boys, each one of them as fit as a fiddle. The family members were on first-name terms and enjoyed spending time together.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSons and Heirs
Subtitle of host publicationSuccession and Political Culture in Nineteenth Century Europe
EditorsFrank Lorenz Müller, Heidi Mehrkens
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages196-210
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-137-45498-0
ISBN (Print)9781137454966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in Modern Monarchy
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impossible task of replacing a model heir: The death of Ferdinand-Philippe d’Orléans and the ‘new France’'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Mehrkens, H. (2015). The impossible task of replacing a model heir: The death of Ferdinand-Philippe d’Orléans and the ‘new France’. In F. L. Müller, & H. Mehrkens (Eds.), Sons and Heirs: Succession and Political Culture in Nineteenth Century Europe (pp. 196-210). (Palgrave Studies in Modern Monarchy). Palgrave Macmillan . https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-137-45498-0_12