The Independence Case in Comparative Perspective

Robert Lineira, Daniel Cetra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scotland is not the only sub-state unit in Europe where relevant political actors make claims for independence. To generate insights on these independence demands, we compare the drivers, arguments and popular support for secession in Scotland, the Basque Country, Catalonia and Flanders. We argue that national identity, party politics and the economy are behind the independence requests, and the exact articulation of these elements varies from case to case. Currently, the most salient of these demands are the ones from Catalonia; Basque demands for self-determination are less prominent than in the past, whereas the demand for a vote on independence is much less articulated in Flanders. Although the Scottish independence referendum has set a precedent for solving independence disputes, we argue that the possibilities of exporting the Scottish referendum experience to other realities are limited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-264
Number of pages8
JournalPolitical Quarterly
Volume86
Issue number2
Early online date4 May 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2015

Fingerprint

Basque
referendum
secession
party politics
political actor
self-determination
national identity
voter
driver
economy
demand
experience
Catalonia

Keywords

  • secession
  • independence referendums
  • Basque Country
  • Catalonia
  • Flanders
  • Scotland

Cite this

The Independence Case in Comparative Perspective. / Lineira, Robert; Cetra, Daniel.

In: Political Quarterly, Vol. 86, No. 2, 19.05.2015, p. 257-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lineira, Robert ; Cetra, Daniel. / The Independence Case in Comparative Perspective. In: Political Quarterly. 2015 ; Vol. 86, No. 2. pp. 257-264.
@article{be36db9d4dd740d6b36be8edaa116047,
title = "The Independence Case in Comparative Perspective",
abstract = "Scotland is not the only sub-state unit in Europe where relevant political actors make claims for independence. To generate insights on these independence demands, we compare the drivers, arguments and popular support for secession in Scotland, the Basque Country, Catalonia and Flanders. We argue that national identity, party politics and the economy are behind the independence requests, and the exact articulation of these elements varies from case to case. Currently, the most salient of these demands are the ones from Catalonia; Basque demands for self-determination are less prominent than in the past, whereas the demand for a vote on independence is much less articulated in Flanders. Although the Scottish independence referendum has set a precedent for solving independence disputes, we argue that the possibilities of exporting the Scottish referendum experience to other realities are limited.",
keywords = "secession, independence referendums, Basque Country, Catalonia, Flanders, Scotland",
author = "Robert Lineira and Daniel Cetra",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1111/1467-923X.12157",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "257--264",
journal = "Political Quarterly",
issn = "0032-3179",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Independence Case in Comparative Perspective

AU - Lineira, Robert

AU - Cetra, Daniel

PY - 2015/5/19

Y1 - 2015/5/19

N2 - Scotland is not the only sub-state unit in Europe where relevant political actors make claims for independence. To generate insights on these independence demands, we compare the drivers, arguments and popular support for secession in Scotland, the Basque Country, Catalonia and Flanders. We argue that national identity, party politics and the economy are behind the independence requests, and the exact articulation of these elements varies from case to case. Currently, the most salient of these demands are the ones from Catalonia; Basque demands for self-determination are less prominent than in the past, whereas the demand for a vote on independence is much less articulated in Flanders. Although the Scottish independence referendum has set a precedent for solving independence disputes, we argue that the possibilities of exporting the Scottish referendum experience to other realities are limited.

AB - Scotland is not the only sub-state unit in Europe where relevant political actors make claims for independence. To generate insights on these independence demands, we compare the drivers, arguments and popular support for secession in Scotland, the Basque Country, Catalonia and Flanders. We argue that national identity, party politics and the economy are behind the independence requests, and the exact articulation of these elements varies from case to case. Currently, the most salient of these demands are the ones from Catalonia; Basque demands for self-determination are less prominent than in the past, whereas the demand for a vote on independence is much less articulated in Flanders. Although the Scottish independence referendum has set a precedent for solving independence disputes, we argue that the possibilities of exporting the Scottish referendum experience to other realities are limited.

KW - secession

KW - independence referendums

KW - Basque Country

KW - Catalonia

KW - Flanders

KW - Scotland

U2 - 10.1111/1467-923X.12157

DO - 10.1111/1467-923X.12157

M3 - Article

VL - 86

SP - 257

EP - 264

JO - Political Quarterly

JF - Political Quarterly

SN - 0032-3179

IS - 2

ER -