The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses

Valerie Gaboriau-Routhiau, Sabine Rakotobe, Emelyne Lecuyer, Imke Mulder, Annaig Lan, Chantal Bridonneau, Violaine Rochet, Annamaria Pisi, Marianne De Paepe, Giovanni Brandi, Gerard Eberl, Johannes Snel, Denise Kelly, Nadine Cerf-Bensussan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Microbiota-induced cytokine responses participate in gut homeostasis, but the cytokine balance at steady-state and the role of individual bacterial species in setting the balance remain elusive. Herein, systematic analysis of gnotobiotic mice indicated that colonization by a whole mouse microbiota orchestrated a broad spectrum of proinflammatory T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T cell responses whereas most tested complex microbiota and individual bacteria failed to efficiently stimulate intestinal T cell responses. This function appeared the prerogative of a restricted number of bacteria, the prototype of which is the segmented filamentous bacterium, a nonculturable Clostridia-related species, which could largely recapitulate the coordinated maturation of T cell responses induced by the whole mouse microbiota. This bacterium, already known as a potent inducer of mucosal IgA, likely plays a unique role in the postnatal maturation of gut immune functions. Changes in the infant flora may thus influence the development of host immune responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-689
Number of pages13
JournalImmunity
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2009

Keywords

  • mucosal immune-system
  • commensal bacteria
  • intestinal bacteria
  • Lamina propria
  • microbiota
  • mice
  • homeostasis
  • IGA
  • differentiation
  • disease
  • MOLIMMUNO
  • MICROBIO

Cite this

Gaboriau-Routhiau, V., Rakotobe, S., Lecuyer, E., Mulder, I., Lan, A., Bridonneau, C., ... Cerf-Bensussan, N. (2009). The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses. Immunity, 31(4), 677-689. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2009.08.020

The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses. / Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Rakotobe, Sabine; Lecuyer, Emelyne; Mulder, Imke; Lan, Annaig; Bridonneau, Chantal; Rochet, Violaine; Pisi, Annamaria; De Paepe, Marianne; Brandi, Giovanni; Eberl, Gerard; Snel, Johannes; Kelly, Denise; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine.

In: Immunity, Vol. 31, No. 4, 16.10.2009, p. 677-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaboriau-Routhiau, V, Rakotobe, S, Lecuyer, E, Mulder, I, Lan, A, Bridonneau, C, Rochet, V, Pisi, A, De Paepe, M, Brandi, G, Eberl, G, Snel, J, Kelly, D & Cerf-Bensussan, N 2009, 'The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses', Immunity, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 677-689. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2009.08.020
Gaboriau-Routhiau V, Rakotobe S, Lecuyer E, Mulder I, Lan A, Bridonneau C et al. The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses. Immunity. 2009 Oct 16;31(4):677-689. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2009.08.020
Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie ; Rakotobe, Sabine ; Lecuyer, Emelyne ; Mulder, Imke ; Lan, Annaig ; Bridonneau, Chantal ; Rochet, Violaine ; Pisi, Annamaria ; De Paepe, Marianne ; Brandi, Giovanni ; Eberl, Gerard ; Snel, Johannes ; Kelly, Denise ; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine. / The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses. In: Immunity. 2009 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 677-689.
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