The Lonely Island: Exile and Community in Recent Island Writing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In much recent Scottish literature, writing about islands is often framed both as a form of cultural critique and a way to question ideas of community. Depictions of Scottish island in mid-twentieth-century poetry and fiction often frame islands simultaneously as places of mythic renewal and necessary exile. More recent writers, including Christine De Luca, Angus Peter Campbell, Jen Hadfield, and J.O. Morgan, use this opposition to portray island communities as ever-shifting networks of individual relations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCommunity in Modern Scottish Literature
EditorsScott Lyall
Place of PublicationLeiden
PublisherBrill
Pages25-42
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9789004317451
ISBN (Print)9789004317444
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

Publication series

NameSCROLL: Scottish Cultural Review of Language and Literature
PublisherBrill
Volume25
ISSN (Print)1571-0734

Keywords

  • Islands
  • community
  • Iain Crichton Smith
  • exile
  • Shetland
  • J.O. Morgan
  • Christine De Luca
  • Charles Avery
  • Angus Peter Campbell
  • Gaelic
  • Jen Hadfield

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  • Cite this

    Baker, T. C. (2016). The Lonely Island: Exile and Community in Recent Island Writing. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish Literature (pp. 25-42). (SCROLL: Scottish Cultural Review of Language and Literature; Vol. 25). Brill. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004317451_003