The Modern Study of Myth and Its Relation to Science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The question for the twenty-first century is whether myth can be brought back to the physical world, but in a way compatible with science. The case of the myth of Gaia will be considered as a possible way of doing so.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-771
Number of pages15
JournalZygon: Journal of Religion and Science
Volume50
Issue number3
Early online date12 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

Fingerprint

myth
science
natural sciences
nineteenth century
twentieth century
twenty-first century
history
Natural Science

Keywords

  • myth
  • religion
  • science
  • social science

Cite this

The Modern Study of Myth and Its Relation to Science. / Segal, Robert A.

In: Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science, Vol. 50, No. 3, 09.2015, p. 757-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{30325e55755942c4beb0655c15abf847,
title = "The Modern Study of Myth and Its Relation to Science",
abstract = "The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The question for the twenty-first century is whether myth can be brought back to the physical world, but in a way compatible with science. The case of the myth of Gaia will be considered as a possible way of doing so.",
keywords = "myth, religion , science , social science",
author = "Segal, {Robert A}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/zygo.12198",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "757--771",
journal = "Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science",
issn = "0591-2385",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Modern Study of Myth and Its Relation to Science

AU - Segal, Robert A

PY - 2015/9

Y1 - 2015/9

N2 - The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The question for the twenty-first century is whether myth can be brought back to the physical world, but in a way compatible with science. The case of the myth of Gaia will be considered as a possible way of doing so.

AB - The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The question for the twenty-first century is whether myth can be brought back to the physical world, but in a way compatible with science. The case of the myth of Gaia will be considered as a possible way of doing so.

KW - myth

KW - religion

KW - science

KW - social science

U2 - 10.1111/zygo.12198

DO - 10.1111/zygo.12198

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 757

EP - 771

JO - Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science

JF - Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science

SN - 0591-2385

IS - 3

ER -