“The more you link, the more you risk…”-a focus group study exploring views about data linkage for pharmacovigilance

Yvonne M Hopf, Christine Bond, Jill J Francis, John Haughney, Peter J Helms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims
The aim of this study was to assess opinions of frontline healthcare professionals on the linking of routinely collected national (Scottish) paediatric data for the purpose of identifying earlier signals of adverse drug reactions (ADRs).
Methods
Stratified purposive sampling led to profession specific focus groups with pharmacists, nurses and medical doctors, from primary and secondary care in different Scottish Health Boards. A topic guide was used to explore the proposed data linkage of routinely collected paediatric data. Discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach to identify themes. Ethical approval was obtained from the North of Scotland Research Ethics Service.
Results
Six focus groups were conducted in 2011 with 22 participants. Views of the proposed data linkage were generally positive. Several issues were identified, including lack of clarity on data ownership and concerns about diversion of funding. Identified issues were at a practical rather than strategic level.
Conclusion
This study identified that professional stakeholder groups are likely to find linkage of paediatric patient data acceptable. Barriers identified could be addressed. Focus group participants commented on the importance of informing patients and members of the public about the benefits of linking healthcare data. These findings clarify the steps that should be taken to ensure the acceptability of data linkage for pharmacovigilance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1143-1150
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume78
Issue number5
Early online date20 Oct 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Pharmacovigilance
Information Storage and Retrieval
Focus Groups
Pediatrics
Research Ethics
Delivery of Health Care
Secondary Care
Ownership
Scotland
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Pharmacists
Primary Health Care
Nurses
Health

Keywords

  • qualitative research
  • pharmacovigilance
  • data linkage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

“The more you link, the more you risk…”-a focus group study exploring views about data linkage for pharmacovigilance. / Hopf, Yvonne M; Bond, Christine; Francis, Jill J; Haughney, John; Helms, Peter J.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 78, No. 5, 11.2014, p. 1143-1150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aims The aim of this study was to assess opinions of frontline healthcare professionals on the linking of routinely collected national (Scottish) paediatric data for the purpose of identifying earlier signals of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods Stratified purposive sampling led to profession specific focus groups with pharmacists, nurses and medical doctors, from primary and secondary care in different Scottish Health Boards. A topic guide was used to explore the proposed data linkage of routinely collected paediatric data. Discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach to identify themes. Ethical approval was obtained from the North of Scotland Research Ethics Service. Results Six focus groups were conducted in 2011 with 22 participants. Views of the proposed data linkage were generally positive. Several issues were identified, including lack of clarity on data ownership and concerns about diversion of funding. Identified issues were at a practical rather than strategic level. Conclusion This study identified that professional stakeholder groups are likely to find linkage of paediatric patient data acceptable. Barriers identified could be addressed. Focus group participants commented on the importance of informing patients and members of the public about the benefits of linking healthcare data. These findings clarify the steps that should be taken to ensure the acceptability of data linkage for pharmacovigilance.",
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