The physical environment and health-enhancing activity during the school commute

global positioning system, geographical information systems and accelerometry

David McMinn*, Nicolas M. Oreskovic, Matt J. Aitkenhead, Derek Johnston, Shemane Murtagh, David A. Rowe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Active school travel is in decline. An understanding of the potential determinants of health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute may help to inform interventions aimed at reversing these trends. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical environmental factors associated with health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute. Data were collected in 2009 on 166 children commuting home from school in Scotland. Data on location and physical activity were measured using global positioning systems (GPS) and accelerometers, and mapped using geographical information systems (GIS). Multi-level logistic regression models accounting for repeated observations within participants were used to test for associations between each land-use category (road/track/path, other man-made, greenspace, other natural) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Thirty-nine children provided 2,782 matched data points. Over one third (37.1%) of children's school commute time was spent in MVPA. Children commuted approximately equal amounts of time via natural and man-made land-uses (50.2% and 49.8% respectively). Commuting via road/track/path was associated with increased likelihood of MVPA (Exp(B)= 1.23, P <0.05), but this association was not seen for commuting via other manmade land-uses. No association was noted between greenspace use and MVPA, but travelling via other natural land-uses was associated with lower odds of MVPA (Exp(B)= 0.32, P <0.05). Children spend equal amounts of time commuting to school via man-made and natural land-uses, yet man-made transportation route infrastructure appears to provide greater opportunities for achieving health-enhancing physical activity levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569-572
Number of pages4
JournalGeospatial Health
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • school travel
  • physical activity
  • physical environment
  • children
  • global positioning systems
  • geographical information systems
  • Scotland
  • peach project
  • travel
  • GPS
  • transportation
  • intensity
  • walking
  • design
  • trends
  • GIS

Cite this

The physical environment and health-enhancing activity during the school commute : global positioning system, geographical information systems and accelerometry. / McMinn, David; Oreskovic, Nicolas M.; Aitkenhead, Matt J.; Johnston, Derek; Murtagh, Shemane; Rowe, David A.

In: Geospatial Health, Vol. 8, No. 2, 05.2014, p. 569-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McMinn, David ; Oreskovic, Nicolas M. ; Aitkenhead, Matt J. ; Johnston, Derek ; Murtagh, Shemane ; Rowe, David A. / The physical environment and health-enhancing activity during the school commute : global positioning system, geographical information systems and accelerometry. In: Geospatial Health. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 569-572.
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abstract = "Active school travel is in decline. An understanding of the potential determinants of health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute may help to inform interventions aimed at reversing these trends. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical environmental factors associated with health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute. Data were collected in 2009 on 166 children commuting home from school in Scotland. Data on location and physical activity were measured using global positioning systems (GPS) and accelerometers, and mapped using geographical information systems (GIS). Multi-level logistic regression models accounting for repeated observations within participants were used to test for associations between each land-use category (road/track/path, other man-made, greenspace, other natural) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Thirty-nine children provided 2,782 matched data points. Over one third (37.1{\%}) of children's school commute time was spent in MVPA. Children commuted approximately equal amounts of time via natural and man-made land-uses (50.2{\%} and 49.8{\%} respectively). Commuting via road/track/path was associated with increased likelihood of MVPA (Exp(B)= 1.23, P <0.05), but this association was not seen for commuting via other manmade land-uses. No association was noted between greenspace use and MVPA, but travelling via other natural land-uses was associated with lower odds of MVPA (Exp(B)= 0.32, P <0.05). Children spend equal amounts of time commuting to school via man-made and natural land-uses, yet man-made transportation route infrastructure appears to provide greater opportunities for achieving health-enhancing physical activity levels.",
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AU - Johnston, Derek

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