The prevalence of burnout syndrome and its association with adherence to safety and practice standards among anesthetists working in Ethiopia

Tikuneh Yetneberk* (Corresponding Author), Meseret Firde, Dinberu Esheti, Abebe Tiruneh, Jolene Moore

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Burnout amongst healthcare professionals is a serious challenge affecting health care practice and quality of care. The ongoing pandemic has highlighted this on a global level. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome and its association with adherence to safety and practice standards among non-physician anesthetists in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst non-physician anesthetists throughout Ethiopia in January 2020 utilizing an online validated questionnaire containing sociodemographic characteristics, symptoms of burnout using the 22 items of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) scale, 10 questions designed to evaluate the best practice of providers, and 7 questions evaluating self-reported errors. The MBI-HSS questions assessed depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment. A high level of burnout was defined as a respondent with an emotional exhaustion score ≥27, a depersonalization score ≥10, and a personal accomplishment score ≤33 in the MBI-HSS subscales. Bi-variable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with burnout. Results Out of a total of 650 anesthetists approached, 400 responded, a response rate of 61.5%. High levels of burnout were identified in 17.3% of Ethiopian anesthesia providers. Significant burnout scores were found in academic anesthetists (p = 0.01), and were associated with less years of anesthesia experience (p < 0.001), consuming >5 alcoholic drinks per week (p = 0.02), and parenthood (p = 0.01). Conclusion We found that non physician anesthetists working in Ethiopia is suffering by high levels of burnout. The problem is alarming in those working at academic environments and less experienced.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102777
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Medicine and Surgery
Volume69
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Anesthetist
  • burnout
  • emotional exhaustion
  • ethiopia

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