The quality of qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care

Karen Forrest-Keenan, Edwin Van Teijlingen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years the value of using qualitative methods in health and social care research has become widely acknowledged.1,2 This paper explores how we can assess the ‘quality’ of qualitative research. It is the second of three papers examining the use of qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care. Our first paper described the three main methods that are generally used in
qualitative studies.3 This paper begins with a discussion about when to use qualitative methods followed by a consideration of some general issues that arise throughout the process of qualitative data collection and analysis. The paper ends by highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative research methods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-259
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2004

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Family Health
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Health
Family Planning Services
Delivery of Health Care
Health Services Research

Keywords

  • research ethics
  • family planning services
  • Great Britain
  • humans
  • qualitative research
  • quality control
  • reproducibility of results
  • reproductive health services

Cite this

The quality of qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care. / Forrest-Keenan, Karen; Van Teijlingen, Edwin.

In: Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.10.2004, p. 257-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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