The Relational Nature of Song in Musical Human-Animal Interactions in Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Traditional Territory, Yukon

Tamara Ranspot* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper brings together emergent conversations in the disciplines of ethnobiology, anthropology, and ethnomusicology to examine the role of song in human-animal relationships in the context of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in First Nation in and around Dawson City, Yukon, Canada. Song has always been a critical tool in Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in human-animal interactions, as a powerful means of communicating with or about animals, who are understood to be non-human persons. This paper argues that the particular sentimental and communicative natures of song are mobilized as a means to promote, reinforce, and embody a certain set of relational values in the biocultural lifeways of Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in citizens. Recently Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in are turning to song as a means of negotiating the effects of global climate change, particularly as these critical relationships become more tenuous and unpredictable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)478-491
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of ethnobotany
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

human-animal relations
Yukon Territory
animal communication
song
animal
interaction
First Nations
anthropology
conversation
climate change
Canada
citizen
human being
Values
animals

Keywords

  • Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in
  • environmental change
  • human-animal interactions
  • relationality
  • song
  • Tr'ondek Hwech'in
  • DANCE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

The Relational Nature of Song in Musical Human-Animal Interactions in Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Traditional Territory, Yukon. / Ranspot, Tamara (Corresponding Author).

In: Journal of ethnobotany, Vol. 39, No. 3, 19.09.2019, p. 478-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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