The Role of Action Control in Implementing Intentions During the First Weeks of Behaviour Change

Falko Sniehotta, G. Nagy, U. Scholz, R. Schwarzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prevailing social cognition models consider behavioural intentions as immediate precursors of actions. This view ignores the role of more proximal self-regulatory processes, such as action control. The latter emerges after an intention has been formed and is supposed to maintain the level of intentions over time and to translate them into action. Three facets of action control were examined in terms of their predictive power for changes in intentions and for physical exercise: (a) awareness of standards, (b) self-monitoring, and (c) self-regulatory effort. A parsimonious 6-item instrument was administered to 122 cardiac patients at six weekly measurement points in time following rehabilitation. A distinction was made between the level of action control and the degree of change in action control, applying a latent growth model. While awareness of standards remained stable, the other two facets exhibited a linear change over the six-week period. Level and change were distinct predictors of physical exercise and changes in intentions. These findings emphasize the importance of self-regulatory mechanisms in the first weeks of trying to overcome a sedentary lifestyle. Action control may be a promising construct to narrow the intention-behaviour gap.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-106
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • PLANNED BEHAVIOR
  • SELF-REGULATION
  • PHYSICAL-EXERCISE
  • EFFICACY
  • SYSTEMS
  • HEALTH
  • REHABILITATION
  • MECHANISMS

Cite this

The Role of Action Control in Implementing Intentions During the First Weeks of Behaviour Change. / Sniehotta, Falko; Nagy, G.; Scholz, U.; Schwarzer, R.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 45, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 87-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sniehotta, Falko ; Nagy, G. ; Scholz, U. ; Schwarzer, R. / The Role of Action Control in Implementing Intentions During the First Weeks of Behaviour Change. In: British Journal of Social Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 45, No. 1. pp. 87-106.
@article{32cb0ca466844749a4065953ce591a56,
title = "The Role of Action Control in Implementing Intentions During the First Weeks of Behaviour Change",
abstract = "Prevailing social cognition models consider behavioural intentions as immediate precursors of actions. This view ignores the role of more proximal self-regulatory processes, such as action control. The latter emerges after an intention has been formed and is supposed to maintain the level of intentions over time and to translate them into action. Three facets of action control were examined in terms of their predictive power for changes in intentions and for physical exercise: (a) awareness of standards, (b) self-monitoring, and (c) self-regulatory effort. A parsimonious 6-item instrument was administered to 122 cardiac patients at six weekly measurement points in time following rehabilitation. A distinction was made between the level of action control and the degree of change in action control, applying a latent growth model. While awareness of standards remained stable, the other two facets exhibited a linear change over the six-week period. Level and change were distinct predictors of physical exercise and changes in intentions. These findings emphasize the importance of self-regulatory mechanisms in the first weeks of trying to overcome a sedentary lifestyle. Action control may be a promising construct to narrow the intention-behaviour gap.",
keywords = "PLANNED BEHAVIOR, SELF-REGULATION, PHYSICAL-EXERCISE, EFFICACY, SYSTEMS, HEALTH, REHABILITATION, MECHANISMS",
author = "Falko Sniehotta and G. Nagy and U. Scholz and R. Schwarzer",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1348/014466605X62460",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "87--106",
journal = "British Journal of Social Psychology",
issn = "0144-6665",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Role of Action Control in Implementing Intentions During the First Weeks of Behaviour Change

AU - Sniehotta, Falko

AU - Nagy, G.

AU - Scholz, U.

AU - Schwarzer, R.

PY - 2006/3

Y1 - 2006/3

N2 - Prevailing social cognition models consider behavioural intentions as immediate precursors of actions. This view ignores the role of more proximal self-regulatory processes, such as action control. The latter emerges after an intention has been formed and is supposed to maintain the level of intentions over time and to translate them into action. Three facets of action control were examined in terms of their predictive power for changes in intentions and for physical exercise: (a) awareness of standards, (b) self-monitoring, and (c) self-regulatory effort. A parsimonious 6-item instrument was administered to 122 cardiac patients at six weekly measurement points in time following rehabilitation. A distinction was made between the level of action control and the degree of change in action control, applying a latent growth model. While awareness of standards remained stable, the other two facets exhibited a linear change over the six-week period. Level and change were distinct predictors of physical exercise and changes in intentions. These findings emphasize the importance of self-regulatory mechanisms in the first weeks of trying to overcome a sedentary lifestyle. Action control may be a promising construct to narrow the intention-behaviour gap.

AB - Prevailing social cognition models consider behavioural intentions as immediate precursors of actions. This view ignores the role of more proximal self-regulatory processes, such as action control. The latter emerges after an intention has been formed and is supposed to maintain the level of intentions over time and to translate them into action. Three facets of action control were examined in terms of their predictive power for changes in intentions and for physical exercise: (a) awareness of standards, (b) self-monitoring, and (c) self-regulatory effort. A parsimonious 6-item instrument was administered to 122 cardiac patients at six weekly measurement points in time following rehabilitation. A distinction was made between the level of action control and the degree of change in action control, applying a latent growth model. While awareness of standards remained stable, the other two facets exhibited a linear change over the six-week period. Level and change were distinct predictors of physical exercise and changes in intentions. These findings emphasize the importance of self-regulatory mechanisms in the first weeks of trying to overcome a sedentary lifestyle. Action control may be a promising construct to narrow the intention-behaviour gap.

KW - PLANNED BEHAVIOR

KW - SELF-REGULATION

KW - PHYSICAL-EXERCISE

KW - EFFICACY

KW - SYSTEMS

KW - HEALTH

KW - REHABILITATION

KW - MECHANISMS

U2 - 10.1348/014466605X62460

DO - 10.1348/014466605X62460

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 87

EP - 106

JO - British Journal of Social Psychology

JF - British Journal of Social Psychology

SN - 0144-6665

IS - 1

ER -