The role of carotenoids in modulating DNA stability and lipid peroxidation: importance for human health

Susan J. Duthie, Andrew R. Collins, Garry G. Duthie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carotenoids are red, yellow, and orange pigments that absorb light in the 400- to 500-nm region of the visible spectrum (Isler, 1971). They are synthesized by photosynthetic microorganisms and plants, but not by animals. Particularly rich sources are yellow-orange fruits and dark green, leafy vegetables. About 700 naturally occurring carotenoids have been identified, of which about 50 can serve as precursors for vitamin A (Olsen, 1992). All are primarily symmetrical, C-40, polyisoprenoid structures with an extensive conjugated double-bond system (Fig. 1). The conjugated backbone of isoprene units is usually inverted at the center of the molecule, imparting the symmetry. Changes in the geometrical configuration about the double bonds result in many cis and trans isomers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFat-Soluble Vitamins
EditorsPeter J. Quinn, Valerian E. Kagan
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherSpringer US
Pages181-207
Number of pages27
Volume30
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4899-1789-8
ISBN (Print)978-1-4899-1791-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Publication series

NameSubcellular Biochemistry
Volume30
ISSN (Print)0306-0225

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of carotenoids in modulating DNA stability and lipid peroxidation: importance for human health'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Duthie, S. J., Collins, A. R., & Duthie, G. G. (1998). The role of carotenoids in modulating DNA stability and lipid peroxidation: importance for human health. In P. J. Quinn, & V. E. Kagan (Eds.), Fat-Soluble Vitamins (Vol. 30, pp. 181-207). (Subcellular Biochemistry; Vol. 30). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-1789-8_8