The role of genetic and environmental factors in the assocation between birthweight and blood pressure: evidence from meta-analysis of twin studies.

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Abstract

Background An inverse association between birthweight and later blood pressure has been found in many studies in singletons. Twin studies have been used to examine whether genetic factors or family environment could account for this association.

Methods A systematic review identified 10 studies covering 3901 twin pairs. Meta-analysis of regression coefficients for the association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure was carried out for unpaired versus paired associations and for paired associations in dizygotic versus monozygotic pairs.

Results After adjustment for current weight or body mass index (BMI), the difference in systolic blood pressure per kg birthweight was -2.0 (95% CI: -3.2, -0.8) mmHg in the unpaired analysis and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.5, 0.7) mmHg in the paired analysis in the same subjects. In the paired analysis by zygosity, in all twins the coefficients were -0.7 (95% CI: -2.3, 0.8) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.8 (95% CI: -2.1, 0.4) mmHg in monozygotic pairs, but in studies which included zygosity tests the coefficients were -1.0 (95% CI: -3.3, 1.6) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.9, 1.3) mmHg in monozygotic pairs.

Conclusions The attenuation of the regression coefficient in the paired analysis provides support for the possibility that factors shared by twins contribute to the association between birthweight and blood pressure in singletons. Comparison of paired analysis in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs could not provide conclusive evidence for a role for genetic as opposed to shared environmental factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)995-1001
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

Keywords

  • twins
  • blood pressure
  • birthweight
  • meta-analysis
  • FETAL ORIGINS HYPOTHESIS
  • CATCH-UP GROWTH
  • AGE
  • DISEASE
  • COHORT
  • SIZE

Cite this

@article{190f64c7a24b4491a01e14b3718027f9,
title = "The role of genetic and environmental factors in the assocation between birthweight and blood pressure: evidence from meta-analysis of twin studies.",
abstract = "Background An inverse association between birthweight and later blood pressure has been found in many studies in singletons. Twin studies have been used to examine whether genetic factors or family environment could account for this association.Methods A systematic review identified 10 studies covering 3901 twin pairs. Meta-analysis of regression coefficients for the association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure was carried out for unpaired versus paired associations and for paired associations in dizygotic versus monozygotic pairs.Results After adjustment for current weight or body mass index (BMI), the difference in systolic blood pressure per kg birthweight was -2.0 (95{\%} CI: -3.2, -0.8) mmHg in the unpaired analysis and -0.4 (95{\%} CI: -1.5, 0.7) mmHg in the paired analysis in the same subjects. In the paired analysis by zygosity, in all twins the coefficients were -0.7 (95{\%} CI: -2.3, 0.8) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.8 (95{\%} CI: -2.1, 0.4) mmHg in monozygotic pairs, but in studies which included zygosity tests the coefficients were -1.0 (95{\%} CI: -3.3, 1.6) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.4 (95{\%} CI: -1.9, 1.3) mmHg in monozygotic pairs.Conclusions The attenuation of the regression coefficient in the paired analysis provides support for the possibility that factors shared by twins contribute to the association between birthweight and blood pressure in singletons. Comparison of paired analysis in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs could not provide conclusive evidence for a role for genetic as opposed to shared environmental factors.",
keywords = "twins, blood pressure, birthweight, meta-analysis, FETAL ORIGINS HYPOTHESIS, CATCH-UP GROWTH, AGE, DISEASE, COHORT, SIZE",
author = "Geraldine McNeill and Chuluuntulga Tuya and Smith, {William Cairns Stewart}",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1093/ije/dyh260",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "995--1001",
journal = "International Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0300-5771",
publisher = "OXFORD UNIV PRESS",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of genetic and environmental factors in the assocation between birthweight and blood pressure: evidence from meta-analysis of twin studies.

AU - McNeill, Geraldine

AU - Tuya, Chuluuntulga

AU - Smith, William Cairns Stewart

PY - 2004/9

Y1 - 2004/9

N2 - Background An inverse association between birthweight and later blood pressure has been found in many studies in singletons. Twin studies have been used to examine whether genetic factors or family environment could account for this association.Methods A systematic review identified 10 studies covering 3901 twin pairs. Meta-analysis of regression coefficients for the association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure was carried out for unpaired versus paired associations and for paired associations in dizygotic versus monozygotic pairs.Results After adjustment for current weight or body mass index (BMI), the difference in systolic blood pressure per kg birthweight was -2.0 (95% CI: -3.2, -0.8) mmHg in the unpaired analysis and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.5, 0.7) mmHg in the paired analysis in the same subjects. In the paired analysis by zygosity, in all twins the coefficients were -0.7 (95% CI: -2.3, 0.8) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.8 (95% CI: -2.1, 0.4) mmHg in monozygotic pairs, but in studies which included zygosity tests the coefficients were -1.0 (95% CI: -3.3, 1.6) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.9, 1.3) mmHg in monozygotic pairs.Conclusions The attenuation of the regression coefficient in the paired analysis provides support for the possibility that factors shared by twins contribute to the association between birthweight and blood pressure in singletons. Comparison of paired analysis in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs could not provide conclusive evidence for a role for genetic as opposed to shared environmental factors.

AB - Background An inverse association between birthweight and later blood pressure has been found in many studies in singletons. Twin studies have been used to examine whether genetic factors or family environment could account for this association.Methods A systematic review identified 10 studies covering 3901 twin pairs. Meta-analysis of regression coefficients for the association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure was carried out for unpaired versus paired associations and for paired associations in dizygotic versus monozygotic pairs.Results After adjustment for current weight or body mass index (BMI), the difference in systolic blood pressure per kg birthweight was -2.0 (95% CI: -3.2, -0.8) mmHg in the unpaired analysis and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.5, 0.7) mmHg in the paired analysis in the same subjects. In the paired analysis by zygosity, in all twins the coefficients were -0.7 (95% CI: -2.3, 0.8) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.8 (95% CI: -2.1, 0.4) mmHg in monozygotic pairs, but in studies which included zygosity tests the coefficients were -1.0 (95% CI: -3.3, 1.6) mmHg in dizygotic pairs and -0.4 (95% CI: -1.9, 1.3) mmHg in monozygotic pairs.Conclusions The attenuation of the regression coefficient in the paired analysis provides support for the possibility that factors shared by twins contribute to the association between birthweight and blood pressure in singletons. Comparison of paired analysis in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs could not provide conclusive evidence for a role for genetic as opposed to shared environmental factors.

KW - twins

KW - blood pressure

KW - birthweight

KW - meta-analysis

KW - FETAL ORIGINS HYPOTHESIS

KW - CATCH-UP GROWTH

KW - AGE

KW - DISEASE

KW - COHORT

KW - SIZE

U2 - 10.1093/ije/dyh260

DO - 10.1093/ije/dyh260

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 995

EP - 1001

JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0300-5771

IS - 5

ER -