The roles of cellular reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress and antioxidants in pregnancy outcomes

Kaïs H Al-Gubory, Paul A Fowler, Catherine Garrel

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

353 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated as by-products of aerobic respiration and metabolism. Mammalian cells have evolved a variety of enzymatic mechanisms to control ROS production, one of the central elements in signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Antioxidants also ensure defenses against ROS-induced damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. ROS and antioxidants have been implicated in the regulation of reproductive processes in both animal and human, such as cyclic luteal and endometrial changes, follicular development, ovulation, fertilization, embryogenesis, embryonic implantation, and placental differentiation and growth. In contrast, imbalances between ROS production and antioxidant systems induce oxidative stress that negatively impacts reproductive processes. High levels of ROS during embryonic, fetal and placental development are a feature of pregnancy. Consequently, oxidative stress has emerged as a likely promoter of several pregnancy-related disorders, such as spontaneous abortions, embryopathies, preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, preterm labor and low birth weight. Nutritional and environmental factors may contribute to such adverse pregnancy outcomes and increase the susceptibility of offspring to disease. This occurs, at least in part, via impairment of the antioxidant defense systems and enhancement of ROS generation which alters cellular signalling and/or damage cellular macromolecules. The links between oxidative stress, the female reproductive system and development of adverse pregnancy outcomes, constitute important issues in human and animal reproductive medicine. This review summarizes the role of ROS in female reproductive processes and the state of knowledge on the association between ROS, oxidative stress, antioxidants and pregnancy outcomes in different mammalian species.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1634-1650
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology
Volume42
Issue number10
Early online date19 Jun 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

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Oxidative stress
Pregnancy Outcome
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Animals
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Cell signaling
Fetal Diseases
Reproductive Medicine
Placentation
Pregnancy
Signal transduction
Premature Obstetric Labor
Corpus Luteum
Cell proliferation
Low Birth Weight Infant
Spontaneous Abortion
Fetal Development
Ovulation

Keywords

  • reactive oxygen species
  • oxidative stress
  • antioxidant enzymes
  • dietary antioxidants
  • reproduction
  • pregnancy outcomes

Cite this

The roles of cellular reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress and antioxidants in pregnancy outcomes. / Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Fowler, Paul A; Garrel, Catherine.

In: International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, Vol. 42, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 1634-1650.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

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