The Scottish Crossbill - what we know and what we don't

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Scottish Crossbill Loxia scotica is Britain's only endemic bird. Given this status, together with its assumed small population size and its association with the few remaining scraps of native pinewood, the Scottish Crossbill has the highest of conservation designations. Its biology is poorly known, however, making it difficult to implement conservation measures. Here, we review some recent work which is investigating different aspects of the biology of crossbills in general and the Scottish Crossbill in particular. Museum, field and laboratory-based studies examining biometrics, vocalisations, feeding ecology, movements and genetics have now clarified some of the inter-relationships among the three crossbill species which are now recognised as breeding in Britain. Such efforts are also helping to identify the future research priorities required to maintain populations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-111
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Birds
Volume96
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

United Kingdom
Biological Sciences
biometry
vocalization
population size
ecology
birds
breeding
Loxia

Cite this

The Scottish Crossbill - what we know and what we don't. / Summers, R.; Piertney, Stuart Brannon.

In: British Birds, Vol. 96, No. 3, 2003, p. 100-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c98cdf7a39bf41b3b69ac3f9afd33988,
title = "The Scottish Crossbill - what we know and what we don't",
abstract = "The Scottish Crossbill Loxia scotica is Britain's only endemic bird. Given this status, together with its assumed small population size and its association with the few remaining scraps of native pinewood, the Scottish Crossbill has the highest of conservation designations. Its biology is poorly known, however, making it difficult to implement conservation measures. Here, we review some recent work which is investigating different aspects of the biology of crossbills in general and the Scottish Crossbill in particular. Museum, field and laboratory-based studies examining biometrics, vocalisations, feeding ecology, movements and genetics have now clarified some of the inter-relationships among the three crossbill species which are now recognised as breeding in Britain. Such efforts are also helping to identify the future research priorities required to maintain populations.",
author = "R. Summers and Piertney, {Stuart Brannon}",
year = "2003",
language = "English",
volume = "96",
pages = "100--111",
journal = "British Birds",
issn = "0007-0335",
publisher = "British Birds Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Scottish Crossbill - what we know and what we don't

AU - Summers, R.

AU - Piertney, Stuart Brannon

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - The Scottish Crossbill Loxia scotica is Britain's only endemic bird. Given this status, together with its assumed small population size and its association with the few remaining scraps of native pinewood, the Scottish Crossbill has the highest of conservation designations. Its biology is poorly known, however, making it difficult to implement conservation measures. Here, we review some recent work which is investigating different aspects of the biology of crossbills in general and the Scottish Crossbill in particular. Museum, field and laboratory-based studies examining biometrics, vocalisations, feeding ecology, movements and genetics have now clarified some of the inter-relationships among the three crossbill species which are now recognised as breeding in Britain. Such efforts are also helping to identify the future research priorities required to maintain populations.

AB - The Scottish Crossbill Loxia scotica is Britain's only endemic bird. Given this status, together with its assumed small population size and its association with the few remaining scraps of native pinewood, the Scottish Crossbill has the highest of conservation designations. Its biology is poorly known, however, making it difficult to implement conservation measures. Here, we review some recent work which is investigating different aspects of the biology of crossbills in general and the Scottish Crossbill in particular. Museum, field and laboratory-based studies examining biometrics, vocalisations, feeding ecology, movements and genetics have now clarified some of the inter-relationships among the three crossbill species which are now recognised as breeding in Britain. Such efforts are also helping to identify the future research priorities required to maintain populations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037350246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 96

SP - 100

EP - 111

JO - British Birds

JF - British Birds

SN - 0007-0335

IS - 3

ER -