The social and linguistic in the acquisition of sociolinguistic norms: caregivers, children and variation

Jennifer Smith, Mercedes Durham, Hazel Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the assumption in early studies that children are monostylistic until sometime around adolescence, a number of studies since then have demonstrated that adult-like patterns of variation may be acquired much earlier. How much earlier, however, is still subject to some debate. In this paper we contribute to this research through an analyses of a number of lexical, phonological and morphosyntactic variables across 29 caregiver/child pairs aged 2;10 to 4;2 in interaction with their primary caregivers. We first establish the patterns of use – both linguistic and social - in caregiver speech and then investigate whether these patterns of use are evident in the child speech. Our findings show that the acquisition of variation is highly variable dependent: some show age differentiation, others do not; some show acquisition of styleshifting, others do not; some show correlations between caregiver input and child output, others do not. We interpret these findings in the light of community norms, social recognition and sociolinguistic value in the acquisition of variation at these early stages.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-324
Number of pages40
JournalLinguistics
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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sociolinguistics
caregiver
linguistics
social recognition
adolescence
Caregivers
interaction
community
Values

Keywords

  • acquisition
  • children
  • caregivers
  • variation
  • sociolinguistic

Cite this

The social and linguistic in the acquisition of sociolinguistic norms : caregivers, children and variation. / Smith, Jennifer; Durham, Mercedes; Richards, Hazel.

In: Linguistics, Vol. 51, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 285-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Jennifer ; Durham, Mercedes ; Richards, Hazel. / The social and linguistic in the acquisition of sociolinguistic norms : caregivers, children and variation. In: Linguistics. 2013 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 285-324.
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