The sociology of late secularization

social divisions and religiosity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

At the start of the twentieth century the religious differed from the religiously indifferent largely in being religious. Now they differ in a number of other social and demographic characteristics that reduce interaction between the two populations further than simple numbers would require. That some of the main carriers of religion are immigrants or adherents of recently imported faiths reinforces the sense that religion is what other people do. In the context of the stock of religious knowledge being depleted and religion-taken-too-seriously being unpopular, the narrow demographic base of the religious makes conversion unlikely and thus makes the reversal of secularization unlikely.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)613-631
Number of pages19
JournalThe British Journal of Sociology
Volume67
Issue number4
Early online date22 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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secularization
sociology
Religion
faith
twentieth century
immigrant
interaction

Cite this

The sociology of late secularization : social divisions and religiosity. / Bruce, Steve.

In: The British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 67, No. 4, 12.2016, p. 613-631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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