The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music

Ronnie Gibson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Within fiddle scholarship, the process of transmission whereby tunes and performance styles and techniques are communicated between people, traditions, and generations remains relatively under-researched. While routes of transmission can be readily identified – from nation to nation, region to region, or fiddler to fiddler – the process is rarely examined in any closer detail. This paper will investigate the manifestations of continuous transmission in the context of Scottish fiddle music by considering musical lineage and published collections of tunes dating from 1700 to 1981.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2012
EventBritish Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference - Institute of Musical Research, University of London, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Sep 201214 Sep 2012

Conference

ConferenceBritish Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period12/09/1214/09/12

Fingerprint

Fiddle
Music
Manifestation
Route
Performance Style

Cite this

Gibson, R. (2012). The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music. Paper presented at British Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference, London, United Kingdom.

The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music. / Gibson, Ronnie.

2012. Paper presented at British Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference, London, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Gibson, R 2012, 'The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music' Paper presented at British Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference, London, United Kingdom, 12/09/12 - 14/09/12, .
Gibson R. The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music. 2012. Paper presented at British Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference, London, United Kingdom.
Gibson, Ronnie. / The Transmission of Scottish Fiddle Music. Paper presented at British Forum for Ethnomusicology Graduate Conference, London, United Kingdom.
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