The use of knee height as a surrogate measure of height in older South Africans

Debbi Marais, M. L. Marias, D. Labadarios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study aimed to determine whether knee height would be a more appropriate surrogate measurement than armspan in determining height and body mass index (BMI) in a group of South African older people (¿¿?¿ 60 years). A random sample of adults (older than 18 years) who attended selected clinics or who lived in selected old-age homes in the Western Cape volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects were divided into a study group of older people (¿¿?¿ 60 years of age, N = 1 233) and a comparative group of younger adults (18 - 59 years, N = 1 038). Armspan, knee height, standing height and weight were measured using standardised techniques. The standing height measurements were significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.0001), with a mean for adults of 1.61 m (standard deviation (SD) 0.09) compared with that of older peole (1.57 m (SD 0.09)). Mean standing height decreased with age. Knee-height measurements were not significantly different between the two groups, but when used to calculate height, the adults were significantly taller (p = 0.0001), with a mean height of 1.67 m (SD 0.06) compared with that of the older people (1.59 m (SD 0.08)). Mean armspan also decreased with age, and derived standing height was significantly different (p = 0.0001) between the two groups, with adults being taller (1.67 m (SD 0.11)) than the older people (1.63 m (SD 0.11)). In this study group, the knee-height measurements were more closely related to the standing height than the armspan. The BMI calculated from armspan-derived height tended to classify the older people towards underweight. Knee-height measurement would appear to be a more accurate and appropriate method to determine height in older people in South Africa.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalSouth African Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Knee
Body Mass Index
Homes for the Aged
Thinness
South Africa
Young Adult
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • elderly
  • knee height

Cite this

The use of knee height as a surrogate measure of height in older South Africans. / Marais, Debbi; Marias, M. L.; Labadarios, D.

In: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2007, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marais, Debbi ; Marias, M. L. ; Labadarios, D. / The use of knee height as a surrogate measure of height in older South Africans. In: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 39-44.
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