The use of multiple informants in public administration research

Data aggregation using organizational echelons

Gareth Enticott*, George A. Boyne, Richard M. Walker

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Surveys are an important methodological tool in public management research. Multiple informant surveys are held to have considerable methodological advantages over elite surveys (the practice of surveying a top manager, e.g., a chief executive). Although in principle multiple informant surveys can provide a more accurate organizational picture, problems of data aggregation arise in practice. To promote better use of multiple informant surveys, this article reviews approaches to aggregating organizational data. It provides the first empirical test of echelon methods of data aggregation for public management research. We find significant differences between echelon aggregations, elite surveys and unstandardized forms of aggregations (e.g., a simple mean). These results support our argument that careful theoretical and empirical analysis of multiple informant surveys data is required to provide valid and reliable measures of organizational properties.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)229-253
    Number of pages25
    JournalJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    Early online date12 Sep 2008
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

    Fingerprint

    public administration
    aggregation
    public management
    elite
    Data aggregation
    Public Administration
    manager
    Elites
    Management research
    Public management

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Public Administration
    • Marketing

    Cite this

    The use of multiple informants in public administration research : Data aggregation using organizational echelons. / Enticott, Gareth; Boyne, George A.; Walker, Richard M.

    In: Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 229-253.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{5c1f0caceb344c9483c678459d0896fe,
    title = "The use of multiple informants in public administration research: Data aggregation using organizational echelons",
    abstract = "Surveys are an important methodological tool in public management research. Multiple informant surveys are held to have considerable methodological advantages over elite surveys (the practice of surveying a top manager, e.g., a chief executive). Although in principle multiple informant surveys can provide a more accurate organizational picture, problems of data aggregation arise in practice. To promote better use of multiple informant surveys, this article reviews approaches to aggregating organizational data. It provides the first empirical test of echelon methods of data aggregation for public management research. We find significant differences between echelon aggregations, elite surveys and unstandardized forms of aggregations (e.g., a simple mean). These results support our argument that careful theoretical and empirical analysis of multiple informant surveys data is required to provide valid and reliable measures of organizational properties.",
    author = "Gareth Enticott and Boyne, {George A.} and Walker, {Richard M.}",
    year = "2009",
    month = "4",
    doi = "10.1093/jopart/mun017",
    language = "English",
    volume = "19",
    pages = "229--253",
    journal = "Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory",
    issn = "1053-1858",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The use of multiple informants in public administration research

    T2 - Data aggregation using organizational echelons

    AU - Enticott, Gareth

    AU - Boyne, George A.

    AU - Walker, Richard M.

    PY - 2009/4

    Y1 - 2009/4

    N2 - Surveys are an important methodological tool in public management research. Multiple informant surveys are held to have considerable methodological advantages over elite surveys (the practice of surveying a top manager, e.g., a chief executive). Although in principle multiple informant surveys can provide a more accurate organizational picture, problems of data aggregation arise in practice. To promote better use of multiple informant surveys, this article reviews approaches to aggregating organizational data. It provides the first empirical test of echelon methods of data aggregation for public management research. We find significant differences between echelon aggregations, elite surveys and unstandardized forms of aggregations (e.g., a simple mean). These results support our argument that careful theoretical and empirical analysis of multiple informant surveys data is required to provide valid and reliable measures of organizational properties.

    AB - Surveys are an important methodological tool in public management research. Multiple informant surveys are held to have considerable methodological advantages over elite surveys (the practice of surveying a top manager, e.g., a chief executive). Although in principle multiple informant surveys can provide a more accurate organizational picture, problems of data aggregation arise in practice. To promote better use of multiple informant surveys, this article reviews approaches to aggregating organizational data. It provides the first empirical test of echelon methods of data aggregation for public management research. We find significant differences between echelon aggregations, elite surveys and unstandardized forms of aggregations (e.g., a simple mean). These results support our argument that careful theoretical and empirical analysis of multiple informant surveys data is required to provide valid and reliable measures of organizational properties.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65249146534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1093/jopart/mun017

    DO - 10.1093/jopart/mun017

    M3 - Article

    VL - 19

    SP - 229

    EP - 253

    JO - Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory

    JF - Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory

    SN - 1053-1858

    IS - 2

    ER -