The value of different aspects of person-centred care

a series of discrete choice experiments in people with long-term conditions

Christopher D Burton (Corresponding Author), Vikki A Entwistle, Alison M Elliott, Nicolas Krucien, Terry Porteous, Mandy Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care.
Design: We systematically identified four attributes of person-centred care. We then measured their value to 923 people with either chronic pain or chronic lung disease over three discrete choice experiments (DCEs) about services to support self-management. We calculated the value of each attribute for all respondents, and identified groups of people with similar preferences using latent class modelling.
Setting: DCEs conducted online via a commercial survey company.
Participants: Adults with either chronic pain (two DCEs, N= 517 and 206 respectively) or breathlessness due to chronic respiratory disease (N=200).
Results: Participants were more likely to choose services with higher level person-centred attributes. They most valued services that took account of a person’s current situation (likelihood of selection increased by 16.9%; 95%CI 15.4 to 18.3) and worked with the person on what they wanted to get from life (15.8%; 14.5 to 17.1). More personally relevant information was valued less than these (12.3%; 11.0 to 13.6). A friendly and personal communicative style was valued least (3.8%; 2.7 to 4.8). Latent class models indicated that a substantial minority of participants valued personally relevant information over the other attributes.
Conclusion: This is the first study to measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care. Professional training needs to emphasise the substance of clinical communication –working responsively with individuals on what matters to them – as well as the style of its delivery.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere015689
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2017

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Chronic Pain
Chronic Disease
Self Care
Dyspnea
Lung Diseases
Communication
Surveys and Questionnaires

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The value of different aspects of person-centred care : a series of discrete choice experiments in people with long-term conditions. / Burton, Christopher D (Corresponding Author); Entwistle, Vikki A; Elliott, Alison M; Krucien, Nicolas; Porteous, Terry; Ryan, Mandy.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 7, No. 4, e015689, 26.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "The value of different aspects of person-centred care: a series of discrete choice experiments in people with long-term conditions",
abstract = "Objective: To measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care.Design: We systematically identified four attributes of person-centred care. We then measured their value to 923 people with either chronic pain or chronic lung disease over three discrete choice experiments (DCEs) about services to support self-management. We calculated the value of each attribute for all respondents, and identified groups of people with similar preferences using latent class modelling. Setting: DCEs conducted online via a commercial survey company.Participants: Adults with either chronic pain (two DCEs, N= 517 and 206 respectively) or breathlessness due to chronic respiratory disease (N=200).Results: Participants were more likely to choose services with higher level person-centred attributes. They most valued services that took account of a person’s current situation (likelihood of selection increased by 16.9{\%}; 95{\%}CI 15.4 to 18.3) and worked with the person on what they wanted to get from life (15.8{\%}; 14.5 to 17.1). More personally relevant information was valued less than these (12.3{\%}; 11.0 to 13.6). A friendly and personal communicative style was valued least (3.8{\%}; 2.7 to 4.8). Latent class models indicated that a substantial minority of participants valued personally relevant information over the other attributes.Conclusion: This is the first study to measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care. Professional training needs to emphasise the substance of clinical communication –working responsively with individuals on what matters to them – as well as the style of its delivery.",
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note = "The study was funded by the Health Foundation (reference THF 7264) and sponsored by the University of Aberdeen. Neither funder nor sponsor had any involvement in the conduct or reporting of the study. Acknowledgements: We wish to thank the members of Aberdeen & District Fibromyalgia support group and Grampian Pain Support for encouraging participation in the study and particularly to two of their members who took active roles as members of the study management committee.",
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AU - Porteous, Terry

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N1 - The study was funded by the Health Foundation (reference THF 7264) and sponsored by the University of Aberdeen. Neither funder nor sponsor had any involvement in the conduct or reporting of the study. Acknowledgements: We wish to thank the members of Aberdeen & District Fibromyalgia support group and Grampian Pain Support for encouraging participation in the study and particularly to two of their members who took active roles as members of the study management committee.

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N2 - Objective: To measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care.Design: We systematically identified four attributes of person-centred care. We then measured their value to 923 people with either chronic pain or chronic lung disease over three discrete choice experiments (DCEs) about services to support self-management. We calculated the value of each attribute for all respondents, and identified groups of people with similar preferences using latent class modelling. Setting: DCEs conducted online via a commercial survey company.Participants: Adults with either chronic pain (two DCEs, N= 517 and 206 respectively) or breathlessness due to chronic respiratory disease (N=200).Results: Participants were more likely to choose services with higher level person-centred attributes. They most valued services that took account of a person’s current situation (likelihood of selection increased by 16.9%; 95%CI 15.4 to 18.3) and worked with the person on what they wanted to get from life (15.8%; 14.5 to 17.1). More personally relevant information was valued less than these (12.3%; 11.0 to 13.6). A friendly and personal communicative style was valued least (3.8%; 2.7 to 4.8). Latent class models indicated that a substantial minority of participants valued personally relevant information over the other attributes.Conclusion: This is the first study to measure the value patients place on different aspects of person-centred care. Professional training needs to emphasise the substance of clinical communication –working responsively with individuals on what matters to them – as well as the style of its delivery.

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