The value of ecological information in conservation conflict

Stephen M. Redpath, William J. Sutherland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The British countryside is renowned for its pastoral beauty: a rich mosaic of farmland, woodlands, hedgerows and winding lanes where biodiversity flourishes. Yet linger within this apparently serene landscape and you are likely to discover an equally rich mosaic of conflict, which can sometimes be bitter and acrimonious. We see conflicts emerge over a wide range of issues, such as the culling of badgers Meles meles to control disease in cattle, the impact of intensive farming techniques on biodiversity or the illegal killing of predators for the benefit of game species. As we see elsewhere in this book, such conflicts are not restricted to the UK; they occur worldwide. Conflicts differ in details and participants, but they are often similar in challenges and strategies for resolution.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions
EditorsStephen M Redpath, R J Gutiérrez, Kevin A Wood, Juliette C Young
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages35-48
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781139084574
ISBN (Print)9781107017696
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

ecological value
biodiversity
game animals
Meles meles
culling (animals)
cattle diseases
intensive farming
badgers
Biodiversity
woodlands
agricultural land
disease control
Cattle Diseases
Mustelidae
predators
Beauty
culling
hedgerow
Agriculture
cattle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Redpath, S. M., & Sutherland, W. J. (2015). The value of ecological information in conservation conflict. In S. M. Redpath, R. J. Gutiérrez, K. A. Wood, & J. C. Young (Eds.), Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions (pp. 35-48). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139084574

The value of ecological information in conservation conflict. / Redpath, Stephen M.; Sutherland, William J.

Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions. ed. / Stephen M Redpath; R J Gutiérrez; Kevin A Wood; Juliette C Young. Cambridge University Press, 2015. p. 35-48.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Redpath, SM & Sutherland, WJ 2015, The value of ecological information in conservation conflict. in SM Redpath, RJ Gutiérrez, KA Wood & JC Young (eds), Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions. Cambridge University Press, pp. 35-48. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139084574
Redpath SM, Sutherland WJ. The value of ecological information in conservation conflict. In Redpath SM, Gutiérrez RJ, Wood KA, Young JC, editors, Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions. Cambridge University Press. 2015. p. 35-48 https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139084574
Redpath, Stephen M. ; Sutherland, William J. / The value of ecological information in conservation conflict. Conflicts in Conservation: Navigating Towards Solutions. editor / Stephen M Redpath ; R J Gutiérrez ; Kevin A Wood ; Juliette C Young. Cambridge University Press, 2015. pp. 35-48
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