The value of self-report assessment of adherence, rhinitis and smoking in relation to asthma control

Jane Clatworthy, David Price, Dermot Ryan, John Haughney, Rob Horne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIMS: To explore the utility of self-report measures of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) adherence, degree of rhinitis and smoking status and their association with asthma control. METHODS: Patients prescribed ICS for asthma at 85 UK practices were sent validated questionnaire measures of control (Asthma Control Questionnaire; ACQ) and adherence (Medication Adherence Report Scale), a two-item measure of smoking status, and a single-item measure of rhinitis. RESULTS: Complete anonymised questionnaires were available for 3916 participants. Poor asthma control (ACQ >1.5) was associated with reported rhinitis (OR = 4.62; 95% CI: 3.71-5.77), smoking (OR = 4.33; 95% CI: 3.58-5.23) and low adherence to ICS (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.18-1.55). The degree of rhinitis was important, with those reporting severe rhinitis exhibiting the worst asthma control, followed by those reporting mild rhinitis and then those reporting no rhinitis symptoms (F(2, 3913)=128.7, p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-305
Number of pages6
JournalPrimary Care Respiratory Journal
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2009

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Rhinitis
Self Report
Asthma
Smoking
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Medication Adherence
Self-Assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • administration, inhalation
  • adolescent
  • adrenal cortex hormones
  • adult
  • aged
  • aged, 80 and over
  • analysis of variance
  • anti-asthmatic agents
  • asthma
  • cross-sectional studies
  • female
  • Great Britain
  • humans
  • logistic models
  • male
  • middle aged
  • patient compliance
  • questionnaires
  • rhinitis
  • self disclosure
  • severity of illness index
  • smoking

Cite this

The value of self-report assessment of adherence, rhinitis and smoking in relation to asthma control. / Clatworthy, Jane; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Haughney, John; Horne, Rob.

In: Primary Care Respiratory Journal, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 300-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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