Through the looking glass: a different lens on medical education

Jennifer Cleland, Trudie Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although academics are usually serious people, it would be incorrect to say they do not sometimes engage in lighter takes on their view of life. Charles Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll, was a fellow and lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford, and although he wrote erudite books on mathematics and logic, it is for his fiction that he is best remembered. In both Alice in Wonderland[2] and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There,[1] Alice is transported to a magical world where nothing is as it seems and where she is obliged to examine life in a completely different way. So in the course of discussions of how Medical Education might celebrate the publication of its 50th volume, the idea of something completely different, an edition looking at current issues within the discipline from a humorous viewpoint, was proposed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1184-1185
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Education
Volume50
Issue number12
Early online date22 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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Cite this

Through the looking glass : a different lens on medical education. / Cleland, Jennifer; Roberts, Trudie.

In: Medical Education, Vol. 50, No. 12, 12.2016, p. 1184-1185.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Cleland, Jennifer ; Roberts, Trudie. / Through the looking glass : a different lens on medical education. In: Medical Education. 2016 ; Vol. 50, No. 12. pp. 1184-1185.
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