Tidal breathing parameters measured by structured light plethysmography in children aged 2-12 years recovering from acute asthma/wheeze compared with healthy children

Hamzah Hmeidi, Shayan Motamedi-Fakhr, Edward K Chadwick, Francis J Gilchrist, Warren Lenney, Richard Iles, Rachel C Wilson, John Alexander (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Measurement of lung function can be difficult in young children. Structured light plethysmography (SLP) is a novel, noncontact method of measuring tidal breathing that monitors displacement of the thoraco-abdominal wall. SLP was used to compare breathing in children recovering from an acute exacerbation of asthma/wheeze and an age-matched cohort of controls. Children aged 2-12 years with acute asthma/wheeze (n = 39) underwent two 5-min SLP assessments, one before bronchodilator treatment and one after. SLP was performed once in controls (n = 54). Nonparametric comparisons of patients to healthy children and of pre-bronchodilator to post-bronchodilator were made for all children, and also stratified by age group (2-5 vs. 6-12 years old). In the asthma/wheeze group, IE50SLP (inspiratory to expiratory flow ratio) was higher (median 1.47 vs. 1.31; P = 0.002), thoraco-abdominal asynchrony (TAA) and left-right asynchrony were greater (both P < 0.001), and respiratory rate was faster (P < 0.001) than in controls. All other timing indices were shorter and displayed reduced variability (all P < 0.001). Variability in time to peak inspiratory flow was also reduced (P < 0.001). Younger children showed a greater effect than older children for TAA (interaction P < 0.05). After bronchodilator treatment, the overall cohort showed a reduction in within-subject variability in time to peak expiratory flow only (P < 0.001). Younger children exhibited a reduction in relative contribution of the thorax, TAA, and variability in TAA (interaction P < 0.05). SLP can be successfully performed in young children. The potential of SLP to monitor diseases such as asthma in children is worthy of further investigation. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02543333.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13752
JournalPhysiological reports
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Plethysmography
Respiration
Asthma
Light
Bronchodilator Agents
Abdominal Wall
Respiratory Rate
Thorax
Age Groups
Lung

Keywords

  • Acute Disease
  • Age Distribution
  • Age Factors
  • Asthma/drug therapy
  • Bronchodilator Agents/pharmacology
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Plethysmography/methods
  • Respiratory Function Tests
  • Respiratory Rate/drug effects
  • Tidal Volume/drug effects

Cite this

Tidal breathing parameters measured by structured light plethysmography in children aged 2-12 years recovering from acute asthma/wheeze compared with healthy children. / Hmeidi, Hamzah; Motamedi-Fakhr, Shayan; Chadwick, Edward K; Gilchrist, Francis J; Lenney, Warren; Iles, Richard; Wilson, Rachel C; Alexander, John (Corresponding Author).

In: Physiological reports, Vol. 6, No. 12, e13752, 06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hmeidi, Hamzah ; Motamedi-Fakhr, Shayan ; Chadwick, Edward K ; Gilchrist, Francis J ; Lenney, Warren ; Iles, Richard ; Wilson, Rachel C ; Alexander, John. / Tidal breathing parameters measured by structured light plethysmography in children aged 2-12 years recovering from acute asthma/wheeze compared with healthy children. In: Physiological reports. 2018 ; Vol. 6, No. 12.
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AU - Gilchrist, Francis J

AU - Lenney, Warren

AU - Iles, Richard

AU - Wilson, Rachel C

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