Toward a better understanding of the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds on health: Human-relevant case studies from sheep models

Catherine Viguié*, Elodie Chaillou, Véronique Gayrard, Nicole Picard-Hagen, Paul A. Fowler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

There are many challenges to overcome in order to properly understand both the exposure to, and effects of, endocrine disruptors (EDs). This is particularly true with respect to fetal life where ED exposures are a major issue requiring toxicokinetic studies of materno-fetal exchange and identification of pathophysiological consequences. The sheep, a monotocous large size species is very suitable for in utero fetal catheterization allowing a modelling approach predictive of human fetal exposure. Predicting adverse effects of EDs on human health is frequently impeded by the wide interspecies differences in the regulation of endocrine functions and their effect on biological processes. Because of its similarity to humans as regards gestational and thyroid physiologies and brain ontogeny, the sheep constitutes a highly appropriate model to move one step further on thyroid disruptor hazard assessment. As a grazing animal, sheep has also been proven to be useful in the evaluation of the consequences of chronic environmental exposure to “real-life” complex mixtures at different stages of the reproductive life cycle.
Original languageEnglish
Article number110711
JournalMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Volume505
Early online date16 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
Sheep
Health
Thyroid Gland
Biological Phenomena
Herbivory
Environmental Exposure
Physiology
Life Cycle Stages
Complex Mixtures
Catheterization
Life cycle
Brain
Hazards
Animals

Keywords

  • Endocrine disruptors
  • Sheep model
  • Fetal exposure
  • Thyroid
  • Mixture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Toward a better understanding of the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds on health : Human-relevant case studies from sheep models. / Viguié, Catherine; Chaillou, Elodie; Gayrard, Véronique; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Fowler , Paul A.

In: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Vol. 505, 110711, 05.04.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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